OFA Bulletin March/April 2010 : Page 2

OFA Mission Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture Professionals 2130 Stella Court Columbus, Ohio 43215-1033 USA 614-487-1117 Fax: 614-487-1216 ofa@ofa.org www.ofa.org OFA Bulletin March/April 2010 NUMBER 920 Editorial Staff Stephen A. Carver, Ph.D. Laura Kunkle Editor Alicia Wells Contributors Gladys A. Andiru Raymond Cloyd Danilo Decio Paul Fisher Jonathan Frantz Lynn P. Griffith Jr W.E. Horner Jinsheng Huang Michelle Jones Roberto G. Lopez Dustin Meador Rose A. Ogutu Geraldine B. Opena Claudio Pasian Craig Regelbrugge Alicia Wells Kimberly A. Williams OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi sion Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture Professionals 2130 S Mission Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture Professionals 2130 Stella Court Columbus, Ohio 43215-1033 USA 614-487-1117 Fax: 614-487-1216 ofa@ofa.org www.ofa.org OFA Bulletin March/April 2010 NUMBER 920 Editorial Staff Stephen A. Carver, Ph.D. Laura Kunkle Editor Alicia Wells Contributors Gladys A. Andiru Raymond Cloyd Danilo Decio Paul Fisher Jonathan Frantz Lynn P. Griffith Jr W.E. Horner Jinsheng Huang Michelle Jones Roberto G. Lopez Dustin Meador Rose A. Ogutu Geraldine B. Opena Claudio Pasian Craig Regelbrugge Alicia Wells Kimberly A. Williams and and regulatory reform of the financial sector is a pressing issue that actually seems to be garnering some serious bipartisan attention, at least in the Senate. There are other must- do’s relating to the budget and appropriations process. And healthcare has left many in Congress weary and increasingly anxious about the November mid-term elections. Still, there is talk about tackling one more big thing. New Fronts On Immigration Two obvious contenders are immigration reform and an energy/carbon cap and trade bill. Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY) and John Kerry (D-MA), the respective lead champions for these two issues, are already arm-wrestling for the top spot, each claiming the advantages of his issue. For the moment, it looks as though Schumer and immigration may be sporting the more impressive muscles. More and more, cap and trade is looking like an economy-killing loser. Moderates representing rural and agricultural districts don’t want to go there; House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-MN) recently said he could no longer support the version of the bill that passed the House in 2009. Comprehensive immigration reform surely Published Bimonthly Copyright© OFA 2010. Permission is hereby given to reprint articles appearing in this OFA Bulletin provided the following reference statement appears with the reprinted article: “Reprinted from the OFA Bulletin, (phone: 614-487-1117) March/April 2010, Number 920.” No endorsement is intended for products mentioned in this OFA Bulletin, nor is criticism meant for products not mentioned. The authors and OFA assume no liability resulting from the use of practices printed in this OFA Bulletin. 2 won’t be an easy lift either. And, talking about a bill that would facilitate legal status for 12 million undocumented at a time of 10 percent unemployment will be a challenge to say the least. Yet, there are both political and economic reasons to tackle the issue. On the economic front, a landmark study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, released in mid January compared three policy options: comprehensive reform including legalization and future flexible worker visa programs, a temporary worker program only, and an enforcement- only regime based on deportation. Researchers found that the comprehensive approach would One More Big Thing? A Mission Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture Professionals 2130 Stella Court Columbus, Ohio 43215-1033 USA 614-487-1117 Fax: 614-487-1216 ofa@ofa.org www.ofa.org OFA Bulletin March/April 2010 NUMBER 920 Editorial Staff Stephen A. Carver, Ph.D. Laura Kunkle Editor Alicia Wells Contributors Gladys A. Andiru Raymond Cloyd Danilo Decio Paul Fisher Jonathan Frantz Lynn P. Griffith Jr W.E. Horner Jinsheng Huang Michelle Jones Roberto G. Lopez Dustin Meador Rose A. Ogutu Geraldine B. Opena Claudio Pasian Craig Regelbrugge Alicia Wells Kimberly A. Williams and regulatory reform of the financial sector is a pressing issue that actually seems to be garnering some serious bipartisan attention, at least in the Senate. There are other must- do’s relating to the budget and appropriations process. And healthcare has left many in Congress weary and increasingly anxious about the November mid-term elections. Still, there is talk about tackling one more big thing. New Fronts On Immigration Two obvious contenders are immigration reform and an energy/carbon cap and trade bill. Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY) and John Kerry (D-MA), the respective lead champions for these two issues, are already arm-wrestling for the top spot, each claiming the advantages of his issue. For the moment, it looks as though Schumer and immigration may be sporting the more impressive muscles. More and more, cap and trade is looking like an economy-killing loser. Moderates representing rural and agricultural districts don’t want to go there; House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-MN) recently said he could no longer support the version of the bill that passed the House in 2009. Comprehensive immigration reform surely Published Bimonthly Copyright© OFA 2010. Permission is hereby given to reprint articles appearing in this OFA Bulletin provided the following reference statement appears with the reprinted article: “Reprinted from the OFA Bulletin, (phone: 614-487-1117) March/April 2010, Number 920.” No endorsement is intended for products mentioned in this OFA Bulletin, nor is criticism meant for products not mentioned. The authors and OFA assume no liability resulting from the use of practices printed in this OFA Bulletin. 2 won’t be an easy lift either. And, talking about a bill that would facilitate legal status for 12 million undocumented at a time of 10 percent unemployment will be a challenge to say the least. Yet, there are both political and economic reasons to tackle the issue. On the economic front, a landmark study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, released in mid January compared three policy options: comprehensive reform including legalization and future flexible worker visa programs, a temporary worker program only, and an enforcement- only regime based on deportation. Researchers found that the comprehensive approach would One More Big Thing? by by Craig J. Regelbrugge OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi OFA Missi ssion Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture A Mission Statement To support and advance professional horticulture. OFA – an Association of Horticulture Professionals 2130 Stella Court Columbus, Ohio 43215-1033 USA 614-487-1117 Fax: 614-487-1216 ofa@ofa.org www.ofa.org OFA Bulletin March/April 2010 NUMBER 920 Editorial Staff Stephen A. Carver, Ph.D. Laura Kunkle Editor Alicia Wells Contributors Gladys A. Andiru Raymond Cloyd Danilo Decio Paul Fisher Jonathan Frantz Lynn P. Griffith Jr W.E. Horner Jinsheng Huang Michelle Jones Roberto G. Lopez Dustin Meador Rose A. Ogutu Geraldine B. Opena Claudio Pasian Craig Regelbrugge Alicia Wells Kimberly A. Williams and regulatory reform of the financial sector is a pressing issue that actually seems to be garnering some serious bipartisan attention, at least in the Senate. There are other must- do’s relating to the budget and appropriations process. And healthcare has left many in Congress weary and increasingly anxious about the November mid-term elections. Still, there is talk about tackling one more big thing. New Fronts On Immigration Two obvious contenders are immigration reform and an energy/carbon cap and trade bill. Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY) and John Kerry (D-MA), the respective lead champions for these two issues, are already arm-wrestling for the top spot, each claiming the advantages of his issue. For the moment, it looks as though Schumer and immigration may be sporting the more impressive muscles. More and more, cap and trade is looking like an economy-killing loser. Moderates representing rural and agricultural districts don’t want to go there; House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-MN) recently said he could no longer support the version of the bill that passed the House in 2009. Comprehensive immigration reform surely Published Bimonthly Copyright© OFA 2010. Permission is hereby given to reprint articles appearing in this OFA Bulletin provided the following reference statement appears with the reprinted article: “Reprinted from the OFA Bulletin, (phone: 614-487-1117) March/April 2010, Number 920.” No endorsement is intended for products mentioned in this OFA Bulletin, nor is criticism meant for products not mentioned. The authors and OFA assume no liability resulting from the use of practices printed in this OFA Bulletin. 2 won’t be an easy lift either. And, talking about a bill that would facilitate legal status for 12 million undocumented at a time of 10 percent unemployment will be a challenge to say the least. Yet, there are both political and economic reasons to tackle the issue. On the economic front, a landmark study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, released in mid January compared three policy options: comprehensive reform including legalization and future flexible worker visa programs, a temporary worker program only, and an enforcement- only regime based on deportation. Researchers found that the comprehensive approach would One More Big Thing? by Craig J. Regelbrugge or or to economists, who understand that labor, capital, and investment are inextricably linked. But there are two very important points to remember about this study. First, it is based on actual experience, not hypothetical assumptions. The study closely examined what happened in the wake of passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which featured a major legalization program. Secondly, the results of the study closely mirror findings from other researchers who have approached the question from different methodological and policy viewpoints, including work by the conservative/libertarian Cato Institute. Details on the study can be found at www.immigrationpolicy.org. While some Democrats will run for cover as opponents hiss “amnesty,” others see a huge need to tackle immigration. Hispanics are now the largest and fastest-growing minority in the United States, and this issue is becoming a litmus test. If immigration reform is once again kicked down the road, will many Hispanic voters stay at home in November? Some Republicans, too, want to get the issue behind them. They recognize that if the Republican Party continues to alienate Hispanics, it will get harder and harder to win national elections. They’d rather compete for Hispanic voters on other issues – family, security and defense, right to life, and entrepreneurship. And unlike the healthcare debate, where Senate Democrats closed ranks and held their 60 votes together, immigration reform will need to be bipartisan. Six to ten Republican votes will be needed to move a bill in the Senate. So what is the outlook? Sen. Schumer and South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham are negotiating the details of a tough bill that will feature provisions on border and interior enforcement, employment eligibility verification, future O F A B u l l e t i n

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 
Loading