LUXE NW #4 : Page 172

TIME HONORED WRITTEN BY JESSE BRATTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY BENJAMIN WOOLSEY THE STORY OF THIS BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON, LAKEFRONT RESIDENCE HAS BEEN DEVELOPING ITS PLOT FOR DECADES. Nestled amid mature trees and huckleberry bushes, the U-shaped house tells a narrative that unfolds in the same way the rhythm of its new courtyard entrance progressively greets its owners and welcomes them home. Originally built in the 1950s by lauded Northwest architect Roland Terry, the homeowners and design team have taken mindful measures to maintain au- thenticity while periodically adjusting the house to fit their needs since they ARCHITECT Marvin Anderson, Sullivan Conard Architects INTERIOR DESIGNER Holly McKinley, Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc. HOME BUILDERS Kim Schademan, Schademan & Associates, Inc., and Scott White, KrekowJennings, Inc. BEDROOMS 5 BATHROOMS 3 SQUARE FEET 5,764

Time Honored

Jesse Bratter

THE STORY OF THIS BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON, LAKEFRONT RESIDENCE HAS BEEN DEVELOPING ITS PLOT FOR DECADES.<br /> <br /> Nestled amid mature trees and huckleberry bushes, the U-shaped house tells a narrative that unfolds in the same way the rhythm of its new courtyard entrance progressively greets its owners and welcomes them home.<br /> <br /> Originally built in the 1950s by lauded Northwest architect Roland Terry, the homeowners and design team have taken mindful measures to maintain authenticity while periodically adjusting the house to fit their needs since they purchased it in the 1990s. “Throughout, the goal has been to honor the character of the Roland Terry architecture and update it in a respectful way as if Roland were working on it today,” says Marvin Anderson, senior associate of Seattle-based Sullivan Conard Architects.<br /> <br /> Anderson worked closely with the firm’s principal, Stephen Sullivan, AIA, and Andrea Ermolli to ensure that the craftsman materials and finishes have a conversation with the owners and the home. “There has been a lot of listening to what’s going to work for the house and what will work for the owners,” he says. “We’ve watched their family grow; we once worried about where the children’s play set would go in the yard, and now we worry about where they will park their cars.” <br /> <br /> Inside the Northwest modern architectural shell, interior designer Holly McKinley, president of Seattle-based Holly McKinley Interior Design, Inc., took her cues from the structure and surroundings. “I love this house—its spatial quality and Japanese influence of the original architecture, and what Stephen and Marvin have done to modify it and make it even better,” she says. “The beautiful nature of the site always seemed to dictate simplicity in the furnishings and elements that would enhance and respect the architecture.”<br /> <br /> To this end, a neutral palette punctuated with color and texture provides comfort and warmth throughout. The living room fireplace, formed from Chinese hand-tooled granite and a metal mantel, speaks to modern Asian influences, along with reclaimed elm whose grain and inherent color was fitting, McKinley says, for some of the furniture. “The whole composition is really harmonious,” says the designer, who has enjoyed searching for vintage finds at various estates and antique stores with the wife during the past 13 years. “The furniture isn’t trying to stand out; it’s trying to feel like part of the space and the architecture. ” <br /> <br /> For builder Kim Schademan, president of Bellevue’s Schademan & Associates, Inc., helping to maintain the architectural integrity of the home coincided with making it energy efficient and livable for a modern family. “We have worked on several phases of remodels of the home over the last six years, including remodeling the children’s bedrooms and bathrooms,” Schademan says. “We also replaced all of the original single-glazed steel French doors with lift-and-slide energy-efficient wood doors, which comprise most of the wall area on two sides of the house.” <br /> <br /> All along, the home has shown a connection to the outdoors, following a natural flow from the courtyard, through the family and living rooms, and out to the rear terrace and lake setting. “This allows the owners space and diversity of environment for entertaining guests and family,” says builder Scott White, director of operations for Seattle-based KrekowJennings, Inc., who worked with local craftsmen to complete metal work and finishes, Venetian plaster walls, hardwood flooring and masonry.<br /> <br /> The collaborative nature of the home’s design team and its labor of love approach remains ever evolving. The next project on the agenda will further tie the indoors to the outdoors, replanting the courtyard to make it an outdoor room. “Over a long period of time, we’ve gotten to know the kids and have watched the house evolve,” Anderson says. “We tried to do something different—contemplative, measured, respectful for the house—that will last for a long time.”

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading