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Manure Manager January-February 2018 : Page 6

INDUSTRY NEWS manuremanager.com Manure, biosolids program launched in Ontario A new funding program being delivered by the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) aims to improve soil health through investments in nutrient application equipment. With 60 percent cost-share support, up to a maximum of $25,000 per business, the Manure and Biosolids Management Program is a significant opportunity for Ontario’s nutrient applicators. It is available to all licensed custom applicators in Ontario and encourages the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs). Funding is available to customize spreading equipment to allow in-crop application, or to allow slurry seeding of cover crops. There is also an innovative approaches that allows businesses to invest in technology that is not yet available in Ontario. Funding for the program is available on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, visit ontariosoilcrop.com. CORNELL WINS $1 MILLION CHALLENGE Tulane University awarded the $1 million grand prize for the Tulane Nitrogen Reduction Challenge to Adapt-N, a team from Cornell University that developed a cloud-based computer modeling system to predict optimum nitrogen application rates for crops using data on weather, field conditions and soil management practices. Adapt-N competed against three others challenge finalists, Cropsmith of Farmer City, Illinois; Pivot Bio of Berkeley, California and Stable’N of Carmi, Illinois. Teams tested their innovations during a growing season on a farm in northeast Louisiana along the Mississippi River. Adapt-N gives farmers precise nitrogen recommendations for every section of their fields using U.S. Department of Agriculture soil databases, field-specific soil and management information and high-resolution weather data. The system is designed to enable farmers to reduce the overall nitrogen rate while increasing profitability. The Tulane Nitrogen Reduction Challenge is an international competition to find a significant, scalable solution to reduce nitrogen runoff from farming, a primary culprit behind vast algae blooms that cause massive annual “dead zones” in water. Tulane launched the grand challenge in 2014 to identify and nurture the most innovative and adaptable technologies to fight hypoxia. Seventy-seven teams from 10 countries entered the contest. Phyllis Taylor, president of the Patrick F . Taylor Foundation and a member of the board of Tulane, funded the effort. BY THE NUMBERS -SFI. INC. 2,200 head $47 value of nutrients provided to crops per animal cow-calf pairs 210 510 1,900 600 acres acres acres pasture row crops certified organic Year family settled in Iowa 6 MANURE MANAGER -January/February 2018 1886 3 40 years number of manure spreaders amount time practicing conservation tillage

In The News

Manure, biosolids program launched in Ontario<br /> <br /> A new funding program being delivered by the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) aims to improve soil health through investments in nutrient application equipment. With 60 percent cost-share support, up to a maximum of $25,000 per business, the Manure and Biosolids Management Program is a significant opportunity for Ontario’s nutrient applicators. It is available to all licensed custom applicators in Ontario and encourages the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs). Funding is available to customize spreading equipment to allow in-crop application, or to allow slurry seeding of cover crops. There is also an innovative approaches that allows businesses to invest in technology that is not yet available in Ontario. Funding for the program is available on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, visit ontariosoilcrop.com.<br /> <br /> CORNELL WINS $1 MILLION CHALLENGE<br /> <br /> Tulane University awarded the $1 million grand prize for the Tulane Nitrogen Reduction Challenge to Adapt-N, a team from Cornell University that developed a cloud-based computer modeling system to predict optimum nitrogen application rates for crops using data on weather, field conditions and soil management practices. Adapt-N competed against three others challenge finalists, Cropsmith of Farmer City, Illinois; Pivot Bio of Berkeley, California and Stable’N of Carmi, Illinois. Teams tested their innovations during a growing season on a farm in northeast Louisiana along the Mississippi River. Adapt-N gives farmers precise nitrogen recommendations for every section of their fields using U.S. Department of Agriculture soil databases, field-specific soil and management information and highresolution weather data. The system is designed to enable farmers to reduce the overall nitrogen rate while increasing profitability. The Tulane Nitrogen Reduction Challenge is an international competition to find a significant, scalable solution to reduce nitrogen runoff from farming, a primary culprit behind vast algae blooms that cause massive annual “dead zones” in water. Tulane launched the grand challenge in 2014 to identify and nurture the most innovative and adaptable technologies to fight hypoxia. Seventy-seven teams from 10 countries entered the contest. Phyllis Taylor, president of the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation and a member of the board of Tulane, funded the effort.<br /> <br /> BY THE NUMBERS - SFI. INC.<br /> <br /> 2,200 head<br /> <br /> $47 value of nutrients provided to crops per animal<br /> <br /> 210 cow-calf pairs<br /> <br /> 510 acres pasture<br /> <br /> 1,900 acres row crops<br /> <br /> 600 acres certified organi<br /> <br /> 1886 Year family settled in Iowa<br /> <br /> 3 number of manure spreaders<br /> <br /> 40 years amount time practicing conservation tillage<br />

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/In+The+News/2980296/467339/article.html.

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