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Fire Fighting in Canada August 2016 : Page 6

STATION to STATION ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs Memorial statue honours fire services LODDs inscription “Brothers who stand together cannot fall alone.” Churchill was a 29-year member of Markham Fire and Emergency Services, serving from 1986 to 2015 in various roles, including first-class firefighter and training officer. He was heavily involved in the Markham firefighters association, eventually serving as president, and was a member of the department’s Occupational Health and Safety Committee. Markham Platoon Chief Scott Daniel, who started his career in Markham around the same time as Churchill, said the firefighter is missed by all members of the department. “He was very impactful in a lot of different lives,” Daniel said. “He made things better for a lot of us.” Daniel described Churchill as intelligent, proactive and always looking out for the safety of his colleagues. The firefighter was instrumental in advocating for fitness equipment in all of Markham’s fire halls, ensuring members had the best fire-resistant gear on the market, and increasing firefighter benefits and salaries. “He thought more of helping others than helping himself, sometimes to a fault,” Daniel said. “The statue is well deserved for all the things he did to improve my life and the department.” The statue means something different to everyone, Daniel said; for him and fellow members of the department, it represents friendship. For others, Churchill, who was a vibrant member of the gay community, is an inspiration. And for fire services across the country, Churchill’s statue stands as a tribute to those who gave their lives to the job. – Maria Church PHOTO BY BETHANY LEE A life-size casting of Markham firefighter Jason Churchill, who died of cancer last year, stands in Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Markham, Ont., firefighter Jason Edward Winston Churchill died last year on June 10 from Burkitt’s Lymphoma; his memory, however, will live on, and not just through family and friends. A memorial bronze statue cast in Churchill’s likeness was unveiled at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery in June to honour firefighters who die in the line of duty. The statue, which is called Undaunted, includes the THE BRASS POLE Promotions & appointments JOHN THOMAS was promoted director of protec-tive services for Elliot Lake, Ont., in April. Thomas, a 21-year member of the Elliot Lake Fire Department, had been serving as interim fire chief since September. In his new role, Thomas will oversee the city’s fire, bylaw and building departments. KEVIN DONALDSON is the new fire chief and general manag-er of emergency services for Greater Napanee Fire Department in Ontario. A more than 20-year member of the vol-unteer department, Donaldson has served as Greater Napanee’s deputy chief since 2014; he took over as chief in the spring. BRIAN CORNFORTH became fire chief for Parkland County Fire Services in Alberta on March 14. Cornforth has more than 30 years of experience in fire and EMS, and has held chief positions in Airdrie and Lethbridge, Alta. He most recently served as deputy chief of planning and office of emer-gency management for the City of Edmonton. RICHARD RENAUD was appointed dep-uty chief for Whitchurch-Stouffville Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario on April 4. Renaud was most recently dep-6 FIREFightingInCanada.com August 2016

Station To Station

ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs

Memorial statue honours fire services LODDs

Markham, Ont., firefighter Jason Edward Winston Churchill died last year on June 10 from Burkitt’s Lymphoma; his memory, however, will live on, and not just through family and friends.

A memorial bronze statue cast in Churchill’s likeness was unveiled at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery in June to honour firefighters who die in the line of duty.

The statue, which is called Undaunted, includes the inscription “Brothers who stand together cannot fall alone.”

Churchill was a 29-year member of Markham Fire and Emergency Services, serving from 1986 to 2015 in various roles, including first-class firefighter and training officer. He was heavily involved in the Markham firefighters association, eventually serving as president, and was a member of the department’s Occupational Health and Safety Committee.

Markham Platoon Chief Scott Daniel, who started his career in Markham around the same time as Churchill, said the firefighter is missed by all members of the department.

“He was very impactful in a lot of different lives,” Daniel said. “He made things better for a lot of us.”

Daniel described Churchill as intelligent, proactive and always looking out for the safety of his colleagues. The firefighter was instrumental in advocating for fitness equipment in all of Markham’s fire halls, ensuring members had the best fire resistant gear on the market, and increasing firefighter benefits and salaries.

“He thought more of helping others than helping himself, sometimes to a fault,” Daniel said. “The statue is well deserved for all the things he did to improve my life and the department.”

The statue means something different to everyone, Daniel said; for him and fellow members of the department, it represents friendship. For others, Churchill, who was a vibrant member of the gay community, is an inspiration. And for fire services across the country, Churchill’s statue stands as a tribute to those who gave their lives to the job.

–Maria Church

CAFC promotes rail emergency app for first responders

The Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs has partnered with the Railway Association of Canada to promote a free mobile app that alerts first responders to the contents of railcars in the event of an emergency.

The AskRail app, designed by North American railways, including CP and CN, allows users to quickly search a railcar’s ID to determine its contents and view company contact information. The app also contains the national Emergency Response Guidebook.

CAFC president Paul Boissonneault, who appears in a promotional video along with Railway Association of Canada president Michael Bourque and members of Vaughan Fire and Rescue Services, said in an interview the app is just one component of the CAFC’s mission to promote the safety of first responders who are on scene when there is an incident involving dangerous goods.

“These incidents when they take place are catastrophic in nature and first responders are inevitably the first ones who are going to be dealing with the situation; we want to make sure they are prepared,” Boissonneault said.

The CAFC was also a partner in the launch of the free online flammable-liquids tool for first responders – rail. Caap.ca/en/index.html – earlier this year.

The AskRail app is free to download in English and French and available to emergency responders who have completed a railway emergency response training course. Qualified responders must email a request to download the app to the Class 1 railway operating in their communities.

According to the Railway Association of Canada, more than 2,000 Canadian first responders had signed up for the app by mid-June.

Learn more and find contact information for CN and CP at www.railcan.ca/safety/ dangerous_goods/askrail. Watch the video by searching AskRail Canada on YouTube.

–Maria Church

B.C. smoke-alarm campaign gets injury-prevention award

A Smoke-alarm campaign that involved research from 50,000 fires in British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario over five years, has received an award from the Canadian Collaborating Centres for Injury Prevention.

The CCCIP, which represents injury prevention centres throughout Canada, gave its 2016 Award for Collaborative Excellence to the City of Surrey, B.C., and the Fire Chiefs’ Association of British Columbia for their efforts to execute the BC Working Smoke Alarm Campaign.

The campaign launched in 2012 and shared statistics collected by Surrey Fire Service members working with the University of the Fraser Valley, and in collaboration with the FCABC.

Researchers found that two thirds of houses that catch fire do not have working smoke alarms, fire damage is reduced by 19 per cent when a working smoke alarm is present, and the death rate per 1,000 fires is 74 per cent higher when there is no working smoke alarm present.

During the campaign, 41,000 smoke alarms were installed across British Columbia, with a focus on vulnerable populations.

–Maria Church

BRIGADE NEWS: From departments across Canada

Coquitlam Fire Rescue in British Columbia, under Fire Chief Wade Pierlot, took delivery in March of four Pierce-built pumpers. Built on Enforcer chassis and powered by 450-hp Detroit Diesel DD13 engines, the units feature 2,000-gpm Waterous PTO pumps, 600-gallon water tanks, Husky 12 Hercules CAFSs, 24-volt Wilburt LED light towers, hydraulic ladder racks, and hard hose-bed covers.

The Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo’s Fort Chipewyan fire station in Alberta, under Fire Chief Harold Wylie, took delivery in March of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper. This unit is built on a Freightliner M2 106 chassis and powered by a 330-hp ISL engine and a six-speed automatic transmission. It features a 1,250-gpm Darley PSP pump, a 900-igallon propoly water tank, a Foam Pro 2001 class A/B system, SL-442 Command light, Akron Deck Master monitor with 12-foot electric riser, FRC Q-70 LED 900 scene lights and PAC board lined compartments.

Oro–Medonte Fire Department in Ontario, under Fire Chief Hugh Murray, took delivery in May of a Dependable Emergency Vehicles built rescue. The unit is built on a Freightliner M2-106 chassis and powered by a 300-hp engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. It features a walk-in body and a Whelen light package.

County of Two Hills Fire Department in Alberta, under Fire Chief Brad Straty, took delivery in February of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built tanker. The unit is built on a Ford F-650 chassis and powered by a 362-hp 6.8-litre Triton V10 engine and a six-speed automatic transmission. It is equipped with a 1,350-igallon galvanized steel tank and a 20-hp Honda pump.

Bonnyville Regional Fire Authority in Alberta, under Regional Fire Chief Brian McEvoy, took delivery in January of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built 16-foot walk-in rescue. Built on a Freightliner M2 106 chassis and powered by a 350-hp Cummins ISL engine and a six-speed automatic transmission, this unit is equipped with a PTO generator, Warn winch with four receiver points, Slide Master tip-down trays with Hannay Cord reel, and FRC push-up and tripod scene lights.

Central Frontenac Fire Department in Ontario, under Fire Chief Bill Young, took delivery in June of a Eastway Fire and Rescue Vehicles-built mini rescue. The unit is built on a Ford F550 chassis and is powered by a 300-hp 6.7 Power Stroker engine and a Torqshift six-speed select shift transmission.

THE BRASS POLE

Promotions & appointments

JOHN THOMAS was promoted director of protective services for Elliot Lake, Ont., in April. Thomas, a 21-year member of the Elliot Lake Fire Department, had been serving as interim fire chief since September. In his new role, Thomas will oversee the city’s fire, bylaw and building departments.

KEVIN DONALDSON is the new fire chief and general manager of emergency services for Greater Napanee Fire Department in Ontario. A more than 20-year member of the volunteer department, Donaldson has served as Greater Napanee’s deputy chief since 2014; he took over as chief in the spring.

BRIAN CORNFORTH became fire chief for Parkland County Fire Services in Alberta on March 14. Cornforth has more than 30 years of experience in fire and EMS, and has held chief positions in Airdrie and Lethbridge, Alta. He most recently served as deputy chief of planning and office of emergency management for the City of Edmonton.

RICHARD RENAUD was appointed deputy chief for Whit church- Stouffville Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario on April 4. Renaud was most recently deputy chief for Guelph-Eramosa Fire Department, and served as a member of Mississauga Fire And Emergency Services for 22 years.

TODD BINKLEY and ANDREW LILLICO were appointed deputy fire chiefs for the Brantford Fire Department on March 21. Binkley, a member of the department since 1999, served as a firefighter until his promotion to assistant training officer and captain in 2013; he holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration emergency services from Lakeland College. Lillico began his career in fire as a volunteer with the Elmira Fire Department, and most recently served as deputy chief for Waterloo Fire Department and fire chief for the Township of Wellesley Fire department.

MIKE LARSSON, a member of Pitt Meadows Fire and Rescue Service in British Columbia since 2003, was promoted to assistant chief in May in charge of firefighter training, occupational health and safety and department emergency planning. Larsson has served the department as a volunteer, captain and fire-safety technician.

Retirements

TERRY GERVAIS, fire chief and general manager of emergency services in Napanee, Ont., retired in March after a 35-year career in fire. Gervais began in the fire service as a volunteer firefighter in the former Kingston Township, and later served in Guelph and Ottawa before joining Napanee as chief in 2011.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Station+To+Station/2536471/321926/article.html.

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