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Fire Fighting in Canada September 2016 : Page 6

STATION to STATION ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs Cold Lake opens 10-bay fire station grand opening event on July 9. “The building was packed and the feedback was very positive,” Fallow said. “We’ve been fortunate in Cold Lake to have quality fire [personnel], and we’ve always had good equipment, and now we have a station that goes with that.” The 25,000-sqare foot station is built on the site of its predecessor, which was more than 60 years old and not a dedicated fire station. The department has one other station, which is also about 60 years old. With a population of 15,000 and a service area of about 2,500 square kilometres, the department responds to between 330 and 340 calls per year. About 70 paid-on-call members staff the department, as well as four full-time members – Fallow, two deputies and an administrative assistant. – Maria Church PHOTO COURTESY COLD LAKE FIRE-RESCUE Cold Lake Fire-Rescue’s new station opened in June and includes 10 truck bays and a dedicated emergency oper-ations centre that is equipped with breakout rooms and an oversized kitchen for large-scale incidents. Jeff Fallow, fire chief and director of emergency management for Cold Lake Fire-Rescue in Alberta, knows he’s a lucky man. In July his department opened a brand-new, state-of-the-art fire station with features that read like a wish list: 10 truck bays, a training tower, dorm rooms for future growth, brick facade with red doors, and, most notably, a dedicated emergency operations centre. Cold Lake is a three-hour drive northeast of Edmonton, and four hours south of Fort McMurray, near the Saskatchewan border. While Cold Lake’s wildland-urban interface area lies further from the city boundary compared to Fort Mac’s, Fallow said wildfire is still a potential concern, and the new station is equipped accordingly. “We now have a proper room to manage a large-scale incident,” Fallow said. “It has a dedicated space, it has breakout rooms, it has a large table in the middle, its own washroom facilities. We built an oversized kitchen so that if we had to feed people we could as well.” Cold Lake Fire-Rescue members moved into the new, $11-million station on June 1. More than 500 community members showed up to the THE BRASS POLE Promotions & appointments DAVID CUNLIFFE is the new fire chief for the Hamilton Fire Department in Ontario. Cunliffe, who has been acting fire chief since January, was promoted on June 27 after about 11 years with the department, including more than eight years serving as the deputy chief responsible for community safety and opera-tional services. Brock Township Fire Department in Ontario promoted CHAD WILSON , MIKE GILLESPIE and WAYNE WARD in May. Wilson and Gillespie, both former Brock captains, were named district chief and chief training officer, respectively. Ward, former chief fire prevention officer for Brock, was promoted to deputy fire chief in charge of fire prevention. SCOTT GRANAHAN has been promoted to fire chief for Meaford and District Fire Department in Ontario. Granahan joined Meaford in 2015 as a deputy chief responsi-ble for fire prevention after serv-ing in various roles for Brock Township and later Georgina, Ont., since 2005. Retirements LEE SMITH , fire chief for Niagara Falls Fire Services in Ontario for the past nine years, retired in at the end of May after 28 years in fire. Smith, 54, served his entire career in Niagara Falls, holding positions of firefighter, fire prevention offi-cer, captain, deputy chief and chief. 6 FIREFightingInCanada.com September 2016

Station To Station

ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs

Cold Lake opens 10-bay fire station

Jeff Fallow, fire chief and director of emergency management for Cold Lake Fire-Rescue in Alberta, knows he’s a lucky man.

In July his department opened a brand-new, state of- the-art fire station with features that read like a wish list: 10 truck bays, a training tower, dorm rooms for future growth, brick facade with red doors, and, most notably, a dedicated emergency operations centre.

Cold Lake is a three-hour drive northeast of Edmonton, and four hours south of Fort McMurray, near the Saskatchewan border. While Cold Lake’s wildland-urban interface area lies further from the city boundary compared to Fort Mac’s, Fallow said wildfire is still a potential concern, and the new station is equipped accordingly.

“We now have a proper room to manage a large-scale incident,” Fallow said. “It has a dedicated space, it has breakout rooms, it has a large table in the middle, its own washroom facilities. We built an over sized kitchen so that if we had to feed people we could as well.”

Cold Lake Fire-Rescue members moved into the new, $11-million station on June 1. More than 500 community members showed up to the grand opening event on July 9.

“The building was packed and the feedback was very positive,” Fallow said. “We’ve been fortunate in Cold Lake to have quality fire [personnel], and we’ve always had good equipment, and now we have a station that goes with that.”

The 25,000-sqare foot station is built on the site of its predecessor, which was more than 60 years old and not a dedicated fire station. The department has one other station, which is also about 60 years old.

With a population of 15,000 and a service area of about 2,500 square kilometres, the department responds to between 330 and 340 calls per year. About 70 paid-on-call members staff the department, as well as four full-time members – Fallow, two deputies and an administrative assistant.

–Maria Church

Free online course teaches cold-weather treatment

Baby It’s Cold Outside – no, not the popular Christmas song, rather the name of an online awareness and education program that teaches search and- rescue personnel as well as first responders how to handle patients suffering from cold injuries.

“Around the world we find statistically that a lot of severely hypothermic victims die during or shortly after rescue, and that’s largely because subjects need to be treated very carefully,” said program manager Ted Rankine, TV producer and water-safety advocate.

“Something as simple as lifting them out of the water vertically, for someone with a very cold heart, would cause enough of a blood shift to put them into cardiac arrest,” Rankine said.

Baby It’s Cold Outside – www.bicorescue.com – is free and open to everyone; it provides rescuers with information to properly deal with hypothermic patients, including removal from the cold, rewarming, and packaging for transport.

Gordon Giesbrecht, a professor of thermophysiology at the University of Manitoba, is the researcher behind the course material. Program participants learn from Giesbrecht’s educational video modules and then apply the knowledge to simulated real-life situations. Those who complete the two- to four-hour program receive a certificate of completion.

“The knowledge we’re trying to convey is quite basic,” Rankine said. “Eighty per cent of treatment is keeping patients horizontal and being extremely gentle, but (responders) have a number of decisions that they have to make, and that’s the core learning that we share.”

Canada’s National Search and Rescue Secretariat funded a large portion of the program, Rankine said, while various other agencies contributed, including the Search and Rescue Volunteer Association of Canada.

Rankine said Baby It’s Cold Outside will roll out a public education portion this fall to help increase awareness about cold-injury prevention.

–Maria Church

Department cracks down on missing smoke alarms

Cornwall Fire Services in Ontario has noticed a spike in the number of smoke alarms purchased for residential units. The motivation behind the spike is money.

Cornwall, a city of 47,000 people 100 kilometres southeast of Ottawa, has one of the highest rates of fires per 10,000 people in the province, says Fire Chief Pierre Voisine.

The city passed a bylaw in March that allows the department to invoice homeowners when firefighters install or replace smoke and carbon-monoxide alarms in buildings.

“We give occupants 24 hours to go to the local store and buy the specific smoke alarm [that was installed in their homes] and return it to us to cancel the invoice,” Voisine said. “The invoice is the incentive to change people’s behaviour – to get people to go to the store and buy the alarm and maybe not install it, but at least return it to us.”

After running for just six weeks, 83 per cent of occupants or building owners whose units required the department to install an alarm bought a replacement alarm within the specified time.

–Maria Church

BRIGADE NEWS: From departments across Canada

LINTLAW AND DISTRICT FIRE FIGHTING ASSOCIATION

Lintlaw and District Fire Fighting Association in Saskatchewan, under Fire Chief Greg Smith, took delivery in March of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper. The unit is built on a Freightliner four-door M2 chassis and powered by a 300-hp Cummins ISL engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. It features a 1,250-gpm Hale DSD pump, and an 800-igallon Propoly water tank.

SIKSIKA FIRST NATION FIRE DEPARTMENT

Siksika First Nation Fire Department in Alberta, under Chief Tom Littlechild, took delivery in March of a Fort Garry Fire Trucksbuilt tanker. Built on a Freightliner 108 SD chassis and powered by a 330-hp ISL engine and a six-speed automatic transmission, the unit features a 750-gpm Hale MBP pump, a 3000-igallon Propoly tank, a Kussmaul Pump Plus 1000, FRC LED scene lights, and air actuated dump chute control.

STARLAND COUNTY – MORRIN FIRE DEPARTMENT

Starland County Morrin Fire Department in Alberta, under Fire Chief Darcy Davidson, took delivery in April of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper. Built on a Freightliner M2 106 chassis and powered by a 350-hp ISL engine, the unit features a 1,250-gpm Darley PSP pump, a 1,000-igallon Propoly water tank, Akron FireFox monitor, FRC Q-65 LED 900 body-mounted scene lights and Sigtronics Intercom System.

HALTON HILLS FIRE DEPARTMENT

Halton Hills Fire Department in Ontario, under Fire Chief Brent Marshall, took delivery in May of a Dependable Emergency Vehicles-built rescue. The unit is built on a 2016 Freightliner M2-106 commercial chassis, 18.5-foot walk-in rescue body. It features seating for two in the cab and four in the body, a 12,000- pound front bumper winch, Honda portable generator, FRC Evolution LED scene lights and Whelen warning lights.

CLARINGTON EMERGENCY AND FIRE SERVICES

Clarington Emergency and Fire Services in Ontario, under Fire Chief Gord Weir, took delivery in June of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built emergency rescue pumper. Built on a Spartan Gladiator chassis and powered by a 450-hp Cummins ISX12 engine and an Allison 4000 EVS transmission, the unit features a Hale DSD1250 pump, a 500-igallon Pro-Poly water tank and a Foam Pro 1600 Class A foam system.

LA RONGE REGIONAL FIRE RESCUE SERVICE

La Ronge Regional Fire Rescue Service in Saskatchewan, under Fire Chief Keven Thomson, took delivery in May of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper. The unit is built on an International 4400 chassis and powered by a 330-hp Navistar N9 engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. It features a 1,250-gpm Darley PSP pump, a 1,200-gallon Poly water tank, a Waterous Advantus 6 A/B foam system and an Akron Fire Fox bumper turret.

THE BRASS POLE

Promotions & appointments

DAVID CUNLIFFE is the new fire chief for the Hamilton Fire Department in Ontario. Cunliffe, who has been acting fire chief since January, was promoted on June 27 after about 11 years with the department, including more than eight years serving as the deputy chief responsible for community safety and operational services.

Brock Township Fire Department in Ontario promoted CHAD WILSON, MIKE GILLESPIE and WAYNE WARD in May. Wilson and Gillespie, both former Brock captains, were named district chief and chief training officer, respectively. Ward, former chief fire prevention officer for Brock, was promoted to deputy fire chief in charge of fire prevention.

SCOTT GRANAHAN has been promoted to fire chief for Meaford and District Fire Department in Ontario. Granahan joined Meaford in 2015 as a deputy chief responsible for fire prevention after serving in various roles for Brock Township and later Georgina, Ont., since 2005.

Retirements

LEE SMITH, fire chief for Niagara Falls Fire Services in Ontario for the past nine years, retired in at the end of May after 28 years in fire. Smith, 54, served his entire career in Niagara Falls, holding positions of firefighter, fire prevention officer, captain, deputy chief and chief.

MIKE MOLLOY, fire chief and community emergency management co-ordiantor for Meaford and District Fire Department in Ontario, retired on June 30. Molloy, a member of the department since 1995, became fire chief in 2010.

RON PRATT retired after 18 years of service as fire chief for La Ronge Regional Fire Rescue Services in Saskatchewan. Pratt, 64, began his 39-year career as a firefighter in Springside, Sask., in 1977, and became chief there in 1979. Almost 10 years later, Pratt moved to La Ronge, where he started a junior firefighter program.

STEVE FOURNIER, fire chief of the Perth Fire Department in Ontario, will retired on Sept. 30 after 26 years in the fire service. Fournier was a firefighter, captain and deputy chief of the Drummond North Elmsley/Tay Valley Fire Department for 14 years before joining Perth as fire chief.

Last alarm

THOMAS RALPH EICHHORN, Deputy Fire Chief for Lac Ste. Anne County Fire Services – Mayerthorpe Fire Department in Alberta, died from Lymphoma on May 1 at 50 years old. Eichhorn began his 34-year service for Lac Ste. Anne County as a junior firefighter with the Cherhill Fire Department; he then served with Sangudo Fire Department for 10 years, and finally Mayerthorpe Fire Department. He is the longest serving member of the joint fire service.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Station+To+Station/2570084/333436/article.html.

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