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Fire Fighting in Canada March 2017 : Page 6

STATION to STATION ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs New fire and paramedic station improves safety in the health and safety of the fire service here in Cramahe Township. “Prior, we operated off the county analog system. Our communications went from very poor to outstanding with the addition of this new system.” The station, home to Cramahe firefighters and Northumberland County paramedics, is the first new build between Northumberland County and a lower-tier municipality for emergency services, Northrup said. Both Northrup and paramedic Chief Bill Detlor have moved their offices to the new building in Colborne, just south of Highway 401. The 12,203 square-foot building is constructed to post-disaster specifications and includes a full kitchen, a 20-foot by 30-foot training room that doubles at the emergency operations centre, and lots of natural light. As is typical in a volunteer firefighting community, firefighters contributed to the project: a 20-foot by 20-foot fitness centre was entirely funded by the Cramahe Firefighters Association. All firefighters from the Colborne and Castleton stations have individual lockers for use of gym facilities. For Northrup, the move has mitigated other safety issues: the old fire station was located within half a kilometre of a rail line, a concern in the event of a derailment. A 1931 Ford pumper is located in the front vestibule of the building, reminding firefighters and visitors of the department’s proud heritage. The township has planned an official opening ceremony for the Colborne Emergency Services Base in the spring. -Laura King PHOTO COURTESY TOWNSHIP OF CRAMAHE The $3.4 million Township of Cramahe emergency services base in Colborne, Ont., houses fire and paramedic services. Opening a new fire station is a career highlight for many fire chiefs. For Brandon Northrup, fire chief for the Township of Cramahe in southwestern Ontario, the Jan. 25 opening of the $3.4 million Colborne Emergency Services Base was the pinnacle of his commitment to firefighter safety. The station opening coincided with the launch of a new digital radio system, a much-needed improvement. “One of the highlights is the digital repeater and antenna located on the privately owned tower,” Northrup said. “This project was completed near the end of 2016 and greatly assists THE BRASS POLE Promotions & appointments TONY BAVOTA moved Feb. 6 to Toronto Fire Services as deputy chief, overseeing two divisions – communications technology accreditation, and analytics and decision sup-port. Bavota had been chief in Burlington, Ont., since 2013, having been promoted from deputy. Bavota has a master’s degree in public administration, an eco-nomics degree, and certificates in labour relations and leader-ship training. Bavota’s graduate work focused on fire-service succession planning. DAN THURMAN was named deputy chief in Collingwood, Ont., in January, taking over from Ross Parr, who was promoted to chief. Thurman was a volunteer firefighter in Collingwood for 20 years, and has been a captain since 2010. ROSS PARR became chief in Collingwood, Ont., in January after Trent Elyea retired. Parr had been deputy chief for eight years. Parr has more than 30 years of firefighting experience, having worked for 25 years in Orillia before moving to Collingwood. The Town of Caledon, Ont., named DARRYL BAILEY as chief in January. Bailey had been acting chief since Dave Forfar retired in September. Bailey has been with Caledon Fire & Emergency Services since 2003; he became deputy chief in 2012. DOUG GOODINGS returned to Ontario in February as deputy 6 FIREFightingInCanada.com March 2017

Station To Station

ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs

New fire and paramedic station improves safety

Opening a new fire station is a career highlight for many fire chiefs.

For Brandon Northrup, fire chief for the Township of Cramahe in southwestern Ontario, the Jan. 25 opening of the $3.4 million Colborne Emergency Services Base was the pinnacle of his commitment to firefighter safety.

The station opening coincided with the launch of a new digital radio system, a much-needed improvement.

“One of the highlights is the digital repeater and antenna located on the privately owned tower,” Northrup said. “This project was completed near the end of 2016 and greatly assistsIn the health and safety of the fire service here in Cramahe Township.

“Prior, we operated off the county analog system. Our communications went from very poor to outstanding with the addition of this new system.”

The station, home to Cramahe firefighters and Northumberland County paramedics, is the first new build between Northumberland County and a lower-tier municipality for emergency services, Northrup said.

Both Northrup and paramedic Chief Bill Detlor have moved their offices to the new building in Colborne, just south of Highway 401.

The 12,203 square-foot building is constructed to post-disaster specifications and includes a full kitchen, a 20-foot by 30-foot training room that doubles at the emergency operations centre, and lots of natural light.

As is typical in a volunteer firefighting community, firefighters contributed to the project: a 20-foot by 20-foot fitness centre was entirely funded by the Cramahe Firefighters Association. All firefighters from the Colborne and Castleton stations have individual lockers for use of gym facilities.

For Northrup, the move has mitigated other safety issues: the old fire station was located within half a kilometre of a rail line, a concern in the event of a derailment.

A 1931 Ford pumper is located in the front vestibule of the building, reminding firefighters and visitors of the department’s proud heritage.

The township has planned an official opening ceremony for the Colborne Emergency Services Base in the spring.


Laura King

Departments combine resources to create rescue service

The St. Anne Regional & Robertville Regional volunteer fire departments in New Brunswick have joined together as mutual-aid partners to provide remote rescue services to those who enjoy outdoors adventures in the areas.

Having been mutual-aid partners for many years in fire fighting and other nonfire related rescue services, the two departments noticed gaps in designated response services in remote areas.

The tourism industry in northeastern New Brunswick very optimistically promotes the winter season to snowmobilers, using the phrase “white gold” to describe the region’s snowy trails.

The area offers a firstclass riding experience for snowmobilers and draws enthusiasts from all over the Maritimes and beyond. But there had been no defined agency to respond to those in need on trails that are inaccessible by emergency vehicles.

Over the past few years, the St. Anne and Robertville fire departments put together a fleet of three 4x4 pick-ups, three snowmobiles, two side by side UTVs (one with tracks), a rescue sled, and a snow-bulance. Both agencies also carry on board a full compliment of Holamtro heavy hydraulic rescue tools, and low-angle rope-rescue gear. Most of this equipment has been purchased through fundraising efforts by both departments.

In addition, the two departments have trained hard to certify almost 40 firefighters in remote rescue 1 and 2.

Thanks to sponsors, donors, and advisory committee members, local government partners and firefighters, those who visit the region to experience the trails and hospitality know that when they need rescue services, firefighters will arrive fully trained and fully equipped.


Deputy Chief Quentin McGrath, St. Anne Regional Fire Department

Barrie firefighters first in Ontario to carry naloxone

No one signs up to be a firefighter to respond to drug-addicted patients overdosing on opioids. But with fentanyl use spreading east across the country, firefighters in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and, now, Ontario, are responding to opioid-overdose calls and carrying naloxone on their trucks.

In January, Barrie Fire Rescue Service became the first department in Ontario to provide its firefighters with naloxone, the opioid-overdose reversing drug. The Alberta government said Feb. 8 that it will provide naloxone kits to first responders and the public – at no cost. And Regina Fire Chief Ernie Polsom said Feb. 9 that firefighters will be trained to administer naloxone. Saskatoon firefighters began carrying naloxone in January.

Calgary Fire Chief Steve Dongworth said in early February that in the six weeks that firefighters had been carrying naloxone the drug had been administered 45 times.

Firefighters in British Columbia have been carrying naloxone for months.

– Laura King

THE BRASS POLE

Promotions & appointments

TONY BAVOTA moved Feb. 6 to Toronto Fire Services as deputy chief, overseeing two divisions – communications technology accreditation, and analytics and decision support. Bavota had been chief in Burlington, Ont., since 2013, having been promoted from deputy. Bavota has a master’s degree in public administration, an economics degree, and certificates in labour relations and leadership training. Bavota’s graduate work focused on fire-service succession planning.

DAN THURMAN was named deputy chief in Collingwood, Ont., in January, taking over from Ross Parr, who was promoted to chief. Thurman was a volunteer firefighter in Collingwood for 20 years, and has been a captain since 2010.

ROSS PARR became chief in Collingwood, Ont., in January after Trent Elyea retired. Parr had been deputy chief for eight years. Parr has more than 30 years of firefighting experience, having worked for 25 years in Orillia before moving to Collingwood. The Town of Caledon, Ont., named DARRYL BAILEY as chief in January. Bailey had been acting chief since Dave Forfar retired in September. Bailey has been with Caledon Fire & Emergency Services since 2003; he became deputy chief in 2012.

DOUG GOODINGS returned to Ontario in February as deputy Chief in Windsor after a stint at the Missouri State Fire Marshal’s Office. Goodings resigned from the Ontario Office of the Fire Marshal in 2015 to move south. Goodings heads Windsor’s training and fire-rescue divisions, and oversees emergency operations and staff development.

Longtime Niagara-on-the- Lake volunteer firefighter ROB GRIMWOOD went back to his roots on Feb. 6, as fire chief. Grimwood had been the fulltime chief in nearby Haldimand County for nine years while volunteering as a district chief in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

BRIAN ELLSWORTH returned in January to Richmond Hill Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario as a deputy chief, after serving nine years as chief in Milton. Ellsworth had been deputy chief Richmond Hill before moving to Milton in 2008.

RETIREMENTS

BOB FOSTER has been a firefighter for 40 years; now he’s going to spend time hunting and fishing. Foster retired March 1 – his 60th birthday – after five years as chief of the Merrickville Fire Department in Ontario; he also worked for 34 years with Ottawa Fire Services.

Chief DAVID SPARLING retires March 31 from the Fire Department of North Huron in Ontario and is going to work with Cowbell Brewery. Sparling has been a firefighter for 25 years; he was promoted to deputy in 2010 and to chief in 2013.

BRIGADE NEWS: From departments across Cana

WHITCHURCH-STOUFVILLE FIRE & EMERGENCY SERVICES

Whitchurch-Stoufville Fire & Emergency Services took delivery in January of a Spartan ERV Gladiator 30-metre (100-foot) platform with a 10-inch raised roof and a six-passenger cab. Purchased through Dependable Emergency Vehicles, the rear-mount quint has a Cummins 550-hp engine and Allison 4000EVS transmission, a 6,000 l/m Waterous pump, a 500-gallon water tank and is equipped with Whelen emergency and scene lighting.

LAKELAND DISTRICT VOLUNTEER DEPARTMENT

The Lakeland District Volunteer Department in Saskatchewan received its new Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper on July 5. Built on an International 4400 chassis with a Navistar N9 300- hp engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission, the truck has a side-control pump panel, a Hale RSD 1000 pump, and a Pro-Poly 1,000-ig tank.

NIAGARA FALLS FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Niagara Falls Fire Department in Ontario received its new rescue truck from Dependable Emergency Vehicles in November. Built on a 2016 Freightliner M2-106 chassis with a Cummings ISL9 350-hp engine and an Allision 3000EVS transmission, the four-seat, walk-in truck has a 15-kw Onan generator, Command Light Knight SL408 with six LED heads, and a Hurst Simo hydraulic pump with two electric cord reels.

ENGLISH RIVER FIRST NATION VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT

The English River First Nation Volunteer Fire Department in Saskatchewan took delivery of its first pumper on Aug. 22. The truck was built by Fort Garry Fire Trucks on a Freightliner M2 chassis with a Cummins ISL 350-hp engine, an Allison 3000 EVS transmission with an enclosed top-control pump panel, a Hale DSD 1250 pump, a Pro-Poly 1000-ig tank and a Foam Pro 2001 system.

THORNHILL FIRE DEPARTMENT

On Jan. 29, the Thornhill Fire Department in B.C. took delivery of a pumper built by Fort Garry Fire Trucks on a Spartan Metro- Star chassis with a Cummins ISL9 380-hp engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. The truck has a Waterous CSU 2000 pump, a Pro-Poly 800-ig tank, a Waterous Advantus 6 with CAFS and an Akron Deck Master 12V monitor with wireless remote.

GANDER FIRE RESCUE

Gander Fire Rescue in Newfoundland, under Chief Paul Fudge, took delivery in February of a pumper-rescue. The truck, built by Dependable Emergency Vehicles on a 2017 Spartan Metro Star-X medium four-door chassis with a 10-inch raised roof, has a Cummings ISL9 380-hp engine, an Allison 3000EVS transmission, a Hale DSD 1,250-gpm pump, a Foampro 2001 system and a 3000-watt inverter.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Station+To+Station/2723029/388030/article.html.

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