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Fire Fighting in Canada June 2016 : Page 6

STATION to STATION ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs Camps encourage girls to join Canadian fire services say that they can do anything they set their minds to,” Siegmann said. This year’s four-day Camp Ignite in August will welcome about 20 new girls as well as a returning peer mentor. Campers learn about search and rescue, dispatch, and live fire, and connect with female firefighter role models. In Ontario, Camp FFITs, run by Fire Service Women of Ontario, are happening in Ottawa, London and Hamilton. More than 220 girls aged 15 to 19 have par-ticipated in Camp FFITs since its inception in 2010 and the application pool is growing each year, said Sue Jones, Ottawa fire prevention officer and Camp FFIT director. “I think the reason that the camp is encouraging people to join is simply that they’re recognizing that [fire fighting] is an option where maybe they hadn’t recognized it before,” Jones said. This year in Ottawa alone, 19 women who have been to Camp FFIT are applying for full-time positions. Three more cities in Ontario and one in Alberta are planning to hold Camp FFITs in 2017. Ember Fire Academy, held each year in Whitehorse, is run by the Yukon Fire Marshal’s Office and offered to females of all ages, for free. Whitehorse firefighter Kiara Adams said fire fighting appeals to young women, but also women who are looking for a career change. “It’s neat because everyone develops friendships over the week and the older ones are supporting the younger ones,” Adams said. Ember runs for five days in late July for 12 successful applicants. Several of Ember’s past participants have gone on to volunteer in Yukon fire services. – Maria Church PHOTO COURTESY CAMP IGNITE Camp Ignite in British Columbia balances serious learning about fire fighting with serious fun for its 20 annual participants. Three camps run by fire-service members across the country are helping encourage young women to join the fire service. Camp Ignite in British Columbia, Ember Fire Academy in Yukon and Camp FFIT (Female Firefighters In Training) in Ontario are taking place this summer and organizers say the camps are helping add women to the fire-service recruitment pool. Capt. Haida Siegmann, a director with Camp Ignite and member of North Vancouver City Fire Department, said the camp, going into its sixth year, gives young women confidence to challenge their boundaries. “It’s not unusual to hear girls at the end of the camp THE BRASS POLE Promotions & appointments BRIAN DURDEN was appointed fire chief in Oakville, Ont., beginning on May 1. Durden began his career as a firefighter with the Town of Oakville Fire Department in 1980 and has served as deputy fire chief of operations since 2008. Durdin was heavily involved in the department’s implementa-tion of regional radios, a com-puter-aided dispatch/ records-management system, station alerting and mobile computer-aided dispatch. BRAD WILSON and GUY MCKINTUCK have been appointed deputies for the Delta Fire Department in British Columbia. Wilson has taken over as deputy chief of operations and McKintuck is in charge of fire prevention; both have served the depart-ment for more than 20 years. FRED STEPHENSON became fire chief for Loyalist Township Emergency Services in Ontario on Feb. 15. A 31-year firefighter with the department, Stephenson had been serving the township as acting chief since March 2015. LUIS GOMES accepted the position of deputy fire chief for Puslinch Fire and Rescue Services in Ontario in March. Gomes has served Puslinch for more than six years and also works as a platoon train-ing officer with the Cambridge Fire Department in Ontario. 6 FIREFightingInCanada.com June 2016

Station To Station

ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs

Camps encourage girls to join Canadian fire services

Three camps run by fire-service members across the country are helping encourage young women to join the fire service.

Camp Ignite in British Columbia, Ember Fire Academy in Yukon and Camp FFIT (Female Firefighters In Training) in Ontario are taking place this summer and organizers say the camps are helping add women to the fire-service recruitment pool.

Capt. Haida Siegmann, a director with Camp Ignite and member of North Vancouver City Fire Department, said the camp, going into its sixth year, gives young women confidence to challenge their boundaries.

“It’s not unusual to hear girls at the end of the camp say that they can do anything they set their minds to,” Siegmann said.

This year’s four-day Camp Ignite in August will welcome about 20 new girls as well as a returning peer mentor. Campers learn about search and rescue, dispatch, and live fire, and connect with female firefighter role models.

In Ontario, Camp FFITs, run by Fire Service Women of Ontario, are happening in Ottawa, London and Hamilton. More than 220 girls aged 15 to 19 have participated in Camp FFITs since its inception in 2010 and the application pool is growing each year, said Sue Jones, Ottawa fire prevention officer and Camp FFIT director.

“I think the reason that the camp is encouraging people to join is simply that they’re recognizing that [fire fighting] is an option where maybe they hadn’t recognized it before,” Jones said.

This year in Ottawa alone, 19 women who have been to Camp FFIT are applying for full-time positions.

Three more cities in Ontario and one in Alberta are planning to hold Camp FFITs in 2017.

Ember Fire Academy, held each year in Whitehorse, is run by the Yukon Fire Marshal’s Office and offered to females of all ages, for free. Whitehorse firefighter Kiara Adams said fire fighting appeals to young women, but also women who are looking for a career change.

“It’s neat because everyone develops friendships over the week and the older ones are supporting the younger ones,” Adams said.

Ember runs for five days in late July for 12 successful applicants. Several of Ember’s past participants have gone on to volunteer in Yukon fire services.

THE BRASS POLE

Promotions & appointments

BRIAN DURDEN was appointed fire chief in Oakville, Ont., beginning on May 1. Durden began his career as a firefighter with the Town of Oakville Fire Department in 1980 and has served as deputy fire chief of operations since 2008. Durdin was heavily involved in the department’s implementation of regional radios, a computer- aided dispatch/ records-management system, station alerting and mobile computer-aided dispatch.

BRAD WILSON and GUY MCKINTUCK have been appointed deputies for the Delta Fire Department in British Columbia. Wilson has taken over as deputy chief of operations and McKintuck is in charge of fire prevention; both have served the department for more than 20 years.

FRED STEPHENSON became fire chief for Loyalist Township Emergency Services in Ontario on Feb. 15. A 31-year firefighter with the department, Stephenson had been serving the township as acting chief since March 2015.

LUIS GOMES accepted the position of deputy fire chief for Puslinch Fire and Rescue Services in Ontario in March. Gomes has served Puslinch for more than six years and also works as a platoon training officer with the Cambridge Fire Department in Ontario.

Program distributes CO alarms to vulnerable families

Caseworkers with the Children’s Aid Society in Huron and Perth Counties in Ontario now carry carbon- monoxide alarms in their vehicles to distribute to families as part of a new program to protect vulnerable residents.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada donated 150 CO alarms to the Huron Perth Hoarding Collation, which is working closely with the Huron Perth Children’s Aid Society to ensure families are not at risk of CO poisoning.

The alarms have LED displays that show continuous levels of CO within a home and track peak levels – both features that help reduce the instances of false alarms.

“We are responding to calls with carbon monoxide present about once every three months,” North Huron Fire Chief David Sparling said in a new release.

“It is these kinds of partnerships that offer a means of educating and achieving compliance,” Sparling said. “In knowing these units will all be protecting children, who are the most susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning, makes it all the more rewarding.”

Ontario passed legislation in 2014 that requires all homes to have a working CO alarm on every level.

– Maria Church

Critical-incident support group launches in Saskatchewan

A team of firefighters, EMS and mental-health professionals in Saskatchewan is offering relief to first responders who have experienced traumatic events in the workplace.

Thirty volunteers so far have been trained in critical- incident stress management (CISM) in conjunction with the Saskatchewan Volunteer Firefighters Association (SVFFA) spring and fall training events, known as fire schools, and the Saskatchewan Association of Fire Chiefs.

Paynton Fire Chief Ellery Russell, who is a CISM team committee member and director with the SVFFA, said the provincial government indicated it will support the team, although a funding amount has yet to be determined.

“Critical incident stress management has been going on for ages,” Russell said, “but it hasn’t been provided to volunteers free of charge. The volunteer fire departments have had to pay for someone to come out and do the intervention.”

Training will continue for CISM team members over the next three years, and organizers hope to eventually have 80 or so fully trained volunteers to provide peer support as needed, and reduce travel costs.

– Maria Church

Retirements

LEE GRANT, fire chief for the Town of Oakville Fire Department in Ontario, retired in April after 36 years in the fire service; he is serving as temporary executive director of emergency planning until the end of 2016. Grant began his career as a firefighter for Peterborough, Ont., in 1980 and later served as chief for 13 years. Grant became a deputy in Oakville in 2008 and was promoted to chief in 2011.

BILL HIGGS, fire chief for the Sechelt Volunteer Fire Department in British Columbia, retired on April 2, the day he turned 59. Higgs served as chief for the past 26 years and was head of the department in the early 1990s when it became the first in North America to use suppression foam to fight municipal fires.

Last Alarm

LLOYD SHIBLEY, past fire chief for the Golden Fire Department, died on Feb. 26 at the age of 77. Shibley was heavily involved with the department throughout his life; he volunteered for more than 25 years and served as fire chief from 1980 to 1994.

MAX HUSSEY, former fire chief for Waterloo Fire Rescue in Ontario, died in February at 67 years old. Hussey served the department for more than 30 years, and was chief from 1993 to his retirement in 2004.

BRIGADE NEWS: From departments across Canada

Lucknow & District Fire Department in Ontario, under Fire Chief Peter Steer, took delivery in December of a Fort Garry Fire Trucksbuilt tanker. Built on an International 4400 chassis and powered by a 330-hp Navistar N9 engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission, this unit features a 500-gpm Hale APS pump, a 1,700-igallon propoly water tank, internal ladder and porta-tank storage, FRC Spectra push-up scene lights.

Coquitlam Fire Rescue in British Columbia, under Fire Chief Nick Delmonico, took delivery in March of four Pierce-built pumpers. Built on Enforcer chassis and powered by 450-hp Detroit Diesel DD13 engines, the units feature 2,000-gpm Waterous PTO pumps, 600-gallon water tanks, Husky 12 Hercules CAFSs, 24-volt Wilburt LED light towers, hydraulic ladder racks, and hard hosebed covers.

Vegreville Emergency Services in Alberta, under Fire Chief Jerrold Lemko, took delivery in January of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built 18-foot walk-around rescue. Built on a Spartan Metro Star LFD 24-foot raised roof chassis and powered by a 450-hp ISL 9 engine and an Allison six-speed automatic transmission, the unit features a CL615 Command Light, Warn 12,000-pound winch, powered awnings, on board cascade SCBA fill station, hydraulic hose reels and electric pump, on-board fridge and command centre.

District of North Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services, under Fire Chief Victor Penman, took delivery in February of two Pierce-built pumpers. Built on Arrow XT chassis and powered by 500-hp Detroit Diesel DD13 engines, these units feature 2,000-gpm Waterous Midship pumps, 400-gallon water tanks, Husky 3 Waterous foam systems, 6-kw Harison Hydraulic generators, hatch compartments, interior cab compartments, and hydraulic ladder racks.

Standard Volunteer Fire Association in Alberta, under Scott Jensen, took delivery in January of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built 12-foot walk around rescue. The unit is built on a Fort F-550 4x4 crew cab and powered by a 300-hp 6.7 litre Power Stroke engine and a sixspeed automatic transmission. It is equipped with Slide Master trays and tip-down shelves.

Inuvik Fire Department in Northwest Territories, under Fire Chief Jim Sawkins, took delivery in December of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks-built pumper. Built on an International 4400 chassis and powered by a 330-hp Navistar N9 engine and an Allison 3000 EVS transmission, the unit features a 1,240-gpm Darley LDM pump, a 1,000-igallon propoly water tank, a Foam Pro 2002 system, Pneumax Platinum series 140 CFM PTO driven CAFS system, Akron Apollo monitor and a KL415D Command Light.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Station+To+Station/2495265/304789/article.html.

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