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Fire Fighting in Canada December 2016 : Page 6

STATION to STATION ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs Built by firefighters from the ground up PHOTO COURTESY OF BOYLE FIRE RESCUE Boyle Fire Rescue, located in Boyle, Alta., has fundraised, designed and constructed a light rescue truck for its department, respectfully referring to it as the Swiss Army Knife of the fleet. The vehicle, which is built upon a used and gutted CN Rail services truck, is responsible for being first on scene in any given emergency call. “We are a volunteer department, and at times it’s difficult to respond with all units required for different scenes. The end result is you don’t always have a full platoon,” said Robin Mikaelsson, deputy chief at Boyle Fire Rescue. “This truck gives us a single unit that can handle 90 per cent of calls, with a quicker response time.” Mikaelsson explained that the truck is equipped with the most advanced lighting control system available and has twice the lighting capabilities of the average vehicle. It can hold 100-gallons of water used by a high-pressure foam pump, which Mikaelsson says “is not unique to all trucks, but unique to one this size.” The truck carries all electrical requirements and has a charging bay for electric tools. Additionally, a sliding wall in the back fits extrication tools with a separate area to house breathing apparatuses. It even has its own areal reconnaissance drone. The department did not skimp on the quality of the equipment even though funding was limited. Boyle firefighters took it upon themselves to construct a truck with a value of $170,000 with a $35,000 budget. Firefighters spent thousands of hours engineering and constructing the vehicle from the ground up. – Beth McKay The Boyle and Area Rescue Team’s light rescue vehicle is built from a CN Rail services truck purchased for $7,000. After gutting, refurbishing and rewiring the interior, the truck was fitted with a Bluetooth control panel that controls the truck’s lights and sirens. First responders participate in mental-illness prevention summit If prevention is the first line of defence for fire, it is similarly crucial in the mental-health sphere. Which is why firefighters and chief officers from across southwestern Ontario participated Oct. 25 in a PTSD summit to examine prevention programs and develop best practices to be adopted by municipalities across the province. The day-long, Ministry of Labour-sponsored summit in Toronto aimed to reverse the cart-before-the-horse process that involves presumptive THE BRASS POLE Promotions & appointments JOHN DEHOOGE was appointed chief in Halton Hills, Ont., in September. DeHooge began his career in 1979 as a firefighter with the Town of Oakville. He served five years as chief for the City of Waterloo and five years as chief for the City of Ottawa, until retiring in 2015. JOSEPH ZAMBITO has been appointed to deputy chief of operations for the Niagara Falls Fire Department in Ontario. Zambito was the deputy chief for the Niagara on the Lake Fire Department since 2001. He is responsible for managing and co-ordinat-ing the municipal fire suppres-sion and training programs. IAN GAVET has been appointed to fire chief for Springwater Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario. Gavet has been a fire-fighter for more than 16 years, training throughout Canada and the United Kingdom. He has held the position of fire chief for the Northern Rockies in Fort Nelson, B.C., and in Miramichi, N.B. JOHN FREDERICKS has been appointed chief of Yellowknife’s fire department. Fredericks has been the chief of the fire department in Kirkland Lake, Ont., and was to begin his new position in early December. Retirements TRENT ELYEA retires from his position as fire chief in Collingwood, Ont., at the end of 2016. 6 FIREFightingInCanada.com December 2016

Station To Station

ACROSS CANADA: Regional news briefs

Built by firefighters from the ground up

Boyle Fire Rescue, located in Boyle, Alta., has fundraised, designed and constructed a light rescue truck for its department, respectfully referring to it as the Swiss Army Knife of the fleet. The vehicle, which is built upon a used and gutted CN Rail services truck, is responsible for being first on scene in any given emergency call.

“We are a volunteer department, and at times it’s difficult to respond with all units required for different scenes. The end result is you don’t always have a full platoon,” said Robin Mikaelsson, deputy chief at Boyle Fire Rescue. “This truck gives us a single unit that can handle 90 per cent of calls, with a quicker response time.”

Mikaelsson explained that the truck is equipped with the most advanced lighting control system available and has twice the lighting capabilities of the average vehicle. It can hold 100-gallons of water used by a high-pressure foam pump, which Mikaelsson says “is not unique to all trucks, but unique to one this size.” The truck carries all electrical requirements and has a charging bay for electric tools. Additionally, a sliding wall in the back fits extrication tools with a separate area to house breathing apparatuses.It even has its own areal reconnaissance drone.

The department did not skimp on the quality of the equipment even though funding was limited. Boyle firefighters took it upon themselves to construct a truck with a value of $170,000 with a $35,000 budget. Firefighters spent thousands of hours engineering and constructing the vehicle from the ground up. – Beth McKay

First responders participate in mental-illness prevention summit

If prevention is the first line of defence for fire, it is similarly crucial in the mental-health sphere.

Which is why firefighters and chief officers from across southwestern Ontario participated Oct. 25 in a PTSD summit to examine prevention programs and develop best practices to be adopted by municipalities across the province.

The day-long, Ministry of Labour-sponsored summit in Toronto aimed to reverse the cart-before-the-horse process that involves presumptive legislation for first responders who develop mental illness but lacks prevention strategies.

When Ontario adopted the presumptive legislation in the spring, Labour Minister Kevin Flynn directed municipalities to develop prevention programs by April 23, 2017.

Many of the firefighters and chief officers who participated are also instructors for the Road to Mental Readiness program adopted by the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs.

Many fire departments across Canada have implemented R2MR or other programs that help firefighters and officers identify indicators for mental illness among colleagues.

Paramedics and police officers also participated in the summit. – Laura King

Chief fire officers recognized for contributions to safety

In October, three members of Manitoba’s fire service were awarded the Mary Beth Dolin Meritorious Fire Service Award.This award acknowledges outstanding contribution to enhancing the safety of Manitobans, and applicants must be nominated for the opportunity to win.

“This is so very humbling,” said award winner Andy Thiessen, fire chief of Morden Fire Department. Thiessen is being recognized for spearheading a campaign to raise money for the Manitoba Fallen Firefighter’s Memorial.He developed and helped to sell a fire service challenge coin commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.Additionally, he represented the Pembina Triangle Mutual Aid District as a director on the board of the Manitoba Association of Fire Chiefs and has served as the president of the association.

Thiessen explained that he was in disbelief when he received notice that he had won and believed it was a mistake.“I know some guys who have received this award and I thought there’s no way I’m in that company,” he said.

The other recipients of the award are Garth McIntyre, deputy fire chief of Glenboro- South Cypress Fire Department and Jack Robertson, captain of Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service. McIntyre is being recognized as a dedicated teacher of fire services in the province and is an instructor and evaluator for the Manitoba Emergency Services College.He has held the role of training officer and lead instructor for the Turtle Mountain Mutual Aid District as well.

Robertson has been instrumental in program development as a member of the advisory committee of the Manitoba Emergency Services College. He has advocated for, and participated in, the development of a partnership between the Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service and the Shaughnessy Park School in North Winnipeg.

The City of Vernon/Vernon Fire Rescue in British Columbia, took delivery in March of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks tanker. This unit is built on a Freightliner M2-106 chassis and powered by a 330-hp Cummins ISL engine and an Allison EVS 3000 transmission. It features a Hankle MBP 600 IG/750 USG pump, and is an aluminum crusader tanker with on spot chain set, rear suction, Whelen emergency light package and a Husky porta tank.

Prince George Fire Rescue in British Columbia took delivery of a Rosenbauer 75-foot mid-mount aerial quint. The unit is built on a Rosenbauer Commander 4000 four-door custom chassis and powered by a 450-hp Cummins ISL engine and Allison EVS-4000 transmission, this unit features a Hale 8FG 1500 IGPM pump and an 11-inch raised roof. It has a FoamPro 2001 foam system and a 500 Imperial gallon water tank, and cab and body collision protection.

The Justice Institute of British Columbia took delivery of a Smeal custom side mount pumper. The unit is built on a Spartan Metro Star chassis and powered by a 450-hp Cummins ISL engine and an Allison 3000 transmission. This truck features a waterous CSU 2250 GPM single stage pump, and carries 500 gallons of water on board. It has an Elkhart Cobra EXM electric monitor with remote and Elkhart X-Stream 1250 GPM nozzle.

Saddle Hills County in Alberta, took delivery in February of a Fort Garry Fire Trucks terminator. This unit is built on a Freightliner M2-106 chassis and is powered by a 350-hp Cummins ISL engine and an Allison EVS 3000 transmission. It features a 1,250 Darley PSR pump, a Foam Pro 2002 foam system, a Foam Pro Power Fill, and special SCBA storage.

Leduc County in Alberta, under Fire Chief Darrell Fleming, took delivery in March of a Fort Garry Trucks pumper. The unit is built on a Spartan Metro Star chassis and powered by a 380-hp Cummins ISL and an Allison EVS 3000 transmission. It features a Darley PSP 1250 USG pump, an Elkhart Cobra EXM Monitor, a Federal Signal Emergency light package and side and rear control panels.

Biggar Rural District Fire Association in Saskatchewan, under Fire Chief Gerry Besse, took delivery of a Fort Garry Trucks pumper in October. The unit is built on a Freightliner M2 – 106 chassis and powered by a 350-hp Cummins ISL engine and an Allison EVS 3000 transmission. It features a 1250 Darley PSP pump, a 1000 I.G. Pro- Poly water tank, and a Waterous Advantus 3E class A/pick up tube for Class B Foam type.

THE BRASS POLE

Promotions & appointments

JOHN DEHOOGE was appointed chief in Halton Hills, Ont., in September.DeHooge began his career in 1979 as a firefighter with the Town of Oakville. He served five years as chief for the City of Waterloo and five years as chief for the City of Ottawa, until retiring in 2015.

JOSEPH ZAMBITO has been appointed to deputy chief of operations for the Niagara Falls Fire Department in Ontario. Zambito was the deputy chief for the Niagara on the Lake Fire Department since 2001. He is responsible for managing and co-ordinating the municipal fire suppression and training programs.

IAN GAVET has been appointed to fire chief for Springwater Fire and Emergency Services in Ontario. Gavet has been a firefighter for more than 16 years, training throughout Canada and the United Kingdom. He has held the position of fire chief for the Northern Rockies in Fort Nelson,B. C., and in Miramichi, N.B.

JOHN FREDERICKS has been appointed chief of Yellowknife’s fire department.Fredericks has been the chief of the fire department in Kirkland Lake, Ont., and was to begin his new position in early December.

Retirements TRENT ELYEA retires from his position as fire chief in Collingwood, Ont., at the end of 2016.

Elyea began his career as a volunteer in Collingwood, in 1982, and was hired on full time shortly thereafter. In 1996 he joined the Orillia Fire Department as deputy chief before taking over as chief.In 2008 he became chief in Collingwood, where he made some major changes including adding more full-time firefighters, purchasing new equipment and overseeing construction of a $5-million fire hall.

GARTH DYCK has retired as chief in Atikokan, Ont., after 24 years in that role. Dyck was an officer with the Atikokan Township Police before moving to fire in January 1992. Dyck served as the Town’s emergency measures co-ordinator and as chief building official, and has been heavily involved in regional initiatives, such as the annual FireCon training weekend and Rainy River District mutual-aid.

HARRY FLAGG has retired as chief of the Wainfleet Fire Department in Ontario. Flagg had been chief since 2012.

Last alarm TERRY BOYKO began his career as a Toronto firefighter in 1975, and quikcly rose through the ranks, holding the positions of training officer, captain, district chief and platoon leader. He retired in 2009 after serving 35 years with the Toronto Fire Services, 11 of which were spent as deputy fire chief. Terry was an active member on the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs board of directors and served eight consecutive terms as vice-president. He died in October at the age of 64.Boyko continued to volunteer with the OAFC’s annual conference after his retirement.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Station+To+Station/2647390/361041/article.html.

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