Luxe Dallas Issue 7 : Page 197

LIGHT TOUCH DALLAS LIGHT TOUCH WRITTEN BY AMY ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVEN VAUGHAN AFTER YEARS OF ADMIRING THE LOOK AND FEEL OF MOUNTAIN RESORT HOMES ALL THE WAY FROM WYOMING TO AUSTRIA, DALLAS RESIDENTS DR. JACK AND SANDRA CONNALLY DECIDED TO BRING THEIR ALPINE VISION BACK HOME TO TEXAS. “We’ve seen many old homes that were built using large exposed beams and wood finish- ing,” says Mrs. Connally. “Michael Malone was able to recreate that feeling for us here without the house looking out of place.” Michael Malone, AIA, studio director of The Michael Malone Studio at WKMC Architects in Dallas, helped interpret the couple’s favorite ski lodge elements into a sleek suburban abode. The house is what he calls a “Texas lodge,” incorporating large living spaces, expressed structural elements, and the use of stone and wood as the major finish materials. The exterior—for which Frank English of Irving-based FBE Construction oversaw the initial construction—is almost completely clad in artfully designed Texas lime- stone finished with a split face; the stone is accented with a dark-gray, standing-seam metal roof and trim. The combination is striking against the towering native trees and virtually maintenance-free. Inside, where Stacy Jones of SCS Construction in Sachse stepped in to helm the interior construction, rooms seamlessly flow into one another. “Ultimately, the design of this house is about natural light and its role in defining and shaping spaces,” says Malone. Indeed, almost everywhere you turn, light filters through sparkling ARCHITECT Michael Malone HOME BUILDERS Frank English & Stacy Jones INTERIOR DESIGNER Michael Malone BEDROOMS 5 BATHROOMS 7 SQUARE FEET 8,900

Light Touch

AMY ANDERSON

AFTER YEARS OF ADMIRING THE LOOK AND FEEL OF MOUNTAIN RESORT HOMES ALL THE WAY FROM WYOMING TO AUSTRIA, DALLAS RESIDENTS DR. JACK AND SANDRA CONNALLY DECIDED TO BRING THEIR ALPINE VISION BACK HOME TO TEXAS. “We’ve seen many old homes that were built using large exposed beams and wood finishing,” says Mrs. Connally. “Michael Malone was able to recreate that feeling for us here without the house looking out of place.” <br /> <br /> Michael Malone, AIA, studio director of The Michael Malone Studio at WKMC Architects in Dallas, helped interpret the couple’s favorite ski lodge elements into a sleek suburban abode. The house is what he calls a “Texas lodge,” incorporating large living spaces, expressed structural elements, and the use of stone and wood as the major finish materials.<br /> <br /> The exterior—for which Frank English of Irving-based FBE Construction oversaw the initial construction—is almost completely clad in artfully designed Texas limestone finished with a split face; the stone is accented with a dark-gray, standing-seam metal roof and trim. The combination is striking against the towering native trees and virtually maintenance-free.<br /> <br /> Inside, where Stacy Jones of SCS Construction in Sachse stepped in to helm the interior construction, rooms seamlessly flow into one another. “Ultimately, the design of this house is about natural light and its role in defining and shaping spaces,” says Malone. Indeed, almost everywhere you turn, light filters through sparkling expanses of glass windows, showcasing stone walls and exposed wood columns and beams. The great room is finished with honed Texas limestone walls, Italian limestone flooring, and tongue-and-groove wood ceilings.The columns and beams are all monolithic timbers, cut to spec and supported by custom-designed stainless-steel connectors. Thanks to this organizational choice, the stone walls of the home are not load-bearing and were arranged to create a screening effect, rather than a fortress feel.<br /> <br /> “Together, these finishes provide a warm and subdued background for the Connallys’ casual lifestyle and collection of art and furniture,” says Malone, who also collaborated with his clients on the interiors. The trio selected decorative lighting, kitchen and bath elements, and a neutral color scheme. The owners’ antique Gustav Stickley and Thomas Moser furniture complements the home’s superstructure, and has a fresh appeal amidst green and brown leather upholstery pieces. <br /> <br /> In keeping with the open atmosphere, a double kitchen sits at the heart of the home and serves as an informal gathering place. Limestone walls and Douglas fir beams continue throughout, surprisingly comfortable next to black granite countertops and cherry cabinetry. In the master suite, wide-plank American Cherry flooring sets an inviting tone for study or repose.<br /> <br /> An adjacent terrace paved in limestone leads up to the elegant backyard pool. There, the Connallys can watch their grandchildren swim from the cooling shade of an enclosed screen porch, an airy version of the interior great room.<br /> <br /> Malone is quick to praise the owners, giving them credit for much of the home’s inspiration. “You cannot design, let alone build a house like this, for clients who are not engaged in the process, clear in their goals and understanding of what they want, and excited about the opportunity to do something unique. This home is a work of art.”

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