1 Man2Man | Fall 2008 : Page 1

Newsletter of the Fall 2008 Issue RESEARCH AWARDED $4.0 MILLION GRANT M anagement options for men with localized (confined to the gland) prostate cancer currently include: active surveillance, surgery (open, laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy), external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Other therapies that use extreme cold (cryotherapy) or high energy sound waves (HIFU) to destroy prostate and prostate cancer tissue are also being explored as treatment options. The success of all of these therapies is highest among patients with organ- confined prostate cancer. Extra- prostatic extension of cancer to peri-prostatic tissues, seminal vesicles or regional lymph nodes is associated with higher rates of failure of localized treatment. Today, treatment decisions are based on clinical criteria such as: serum PSA levels, extent of cancer on rectal examination, and cancer grade on biopsy. This information can assist in selecting patients with localized cancer and predicting the success rates of prostate treatments. However, even with this information doctors are limited in their ability to predict outcomes or tailor therapies to individual men. This picture illustrates the fusion between MRI and Ultrasound. Thus, there is a pressing need for new tools that can more accurately identify and characterize a prostate tumor in any given individual in order to improve therapy selection and guide treatments like surgery and radiation. The research grant awarded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will enable a team of scientists at the London Regional Cancer Program to further develop the use of sophisticated imaging techniques for this purpose. The premise of the grant is that by using advanced imaging techniques we will be able to accurately determine the extent, location and biologic continued on page 3

Research Awarded $4.0 Million Grant

M anagement options for men with localized (confined to the gland) prostate cancer currently include: active surveillance, surgery (open, laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy), external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Other therapies that use extreme cold (cryotherapy) or high energy sound waves (HIFU) to destroy prostate and prostate cancer tissue are also being explored as treatment options. The success of all of these therapies is highest among patients with organconfined prostate cancer. Extraprostatic extension of cancer to peri-prostatic tissues, seminal vesicles or regional lymph nodes is associated with higher rates of failure of localized treatment.<br /> <br /> Today, treatment decisions are based on clinical criteria such as: serum PSA levels, extent of cancer on rectal examination, and cancer grade on biopsy.<br /> <br /> This information can assist in selecting patients with localized cancer and predicting the success rates of prostate treatments.<br /> <br /> However, even with this information doctors are limited in their ability to predict outcomes or tailor therapies to individual men.<br /> <br /> Thus, there is a pressing need for new tools that can more accurately identify and characterize a prostate tumor in any given individual in order to improve therapy selection and guide treatments like surgery and radiation.<br /> <br /> The research grant awarded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will enable a team of scientists at the London Regional Cancer Program to further develop the use of sophisticated imaging techniques for this purpose.<br /> <br /> The premise of the grant is that by using advanced imaging techniques we will be able to accurately determine the extent, location and biologicCharacteristics of a prostate cancer and, as a result, improve diagnostic and treatment outcomes.<br /> <br /> We propose to test this premise by developing prostate maps based on advanced imaging that can be used to non-invasively predict, with millimetre accuracy, the distribution of cancer within the prostate. In essence, we want to produce a “prostate GPS” that will help guide our doctors so they can target prostate cancer with high precision when performing a biopsy or treatment for prostate cancer. Our “prostate GPS” will be generated from scans from men who will be treated with surgery. We will then test the maps against radical prostatectomy specimens using the three-dimensional tissue distribution of cancer as “the gold standard.” We anticipate our “prostate GPS” will provide new techniques to enable early detection and treatment through more accurate guidance of biopsy as well as treatments like surgery, radiation and HIFU.<br /> <br /> Our team comprises a broad cross section of scientists, statisticians, pathologists, surgeons and oncologists.<br /> <br /> This multidisciplinary team will ensure our innovations are translated into clinical use as efficiently as possible. Through the grant we will be able to help train the next generation of scientists and clinicians in the use of these technical innovations to help men with prostate cancer.

Prostate Cancer Centre

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