STYLE STYLE 0206 2011 : Page 12

12 s t yle ma gazine febru ar y 2011 from the editor The places I have called home As I started working on this Home and Garden annual issue, I couldn’t help but think back on the many places I have called home. Born into a middle-class family in Miami, I have lived in nothing like the grand homes we bring to you each month in the pages of Style. Still, I have loved each of the places I have called home, for a variety of reasons. The one with the most memories is the home I grew up in as a child — a two-story structure in Bradenton. The first floor was occupied by the Nautilus, a shell and gift shop owned by my parents. At the end of the workday, my mom, dad, sister and I would simply “go home” to the second floor. It was odd in some ways. No yard — just a parking lot. No real front door. No neigh-borhood, per se, as it was right on U.S. 41. Yet it was fun — poking around the store at night, working the cash register when I was a little girl, waiting on customers when I was young enough to equate work with fun. I loved living in that big, old building. And I still have fond memories when I drive by it today. No longer a shell store, today it houses the Manatee County Humane Society, which seems only appropriate, don’t you think? The next place that held a special place in my heart was the apartment I rented when I worked in New York City. Knowing nothing about the various neighborhoods, I some-how landed in Brooklyn and found an apartment on the below-street-level floor of a brownstone owned by a professor at NYU. “Eureka,” I thought to myself. A one-bedroom apartment with hardwood floors, fire -places in both the bedroom and living room, a claw-foot tub and a marble sink — all for $450 a month. (This was in 1980!) The question I didn’t ask was, “What’s the neighborhood like?” That question was answered for me about a week later when a taxi driver refused to take me home at 9 p.m. because, he said, it was too dangerous. While I did have my share of New York adventures, I loved that apartment every single day I was there. The other home that is nearest and dearest to my heart is my current one — the first home I ever owned. It’s a simple, ranch-style house, well suited for me and my three dogs. It is no mansion. It has no oversized bath, or big walk-in closets. But it is mine, and I love every inch of it. As you browse this Home and Garden annual, I hope you, too, will take a few mo-ments to remember the homes that you have lived in and loved. Each one remains a part of us, no matter where we call home today. Yours, happy at home, We begin our home and Garden annual by meeting Donna Simmons, a woman who made her love for new orleans the inspiration for her home on Siesta Key. Complete with shutters, a wrought-iron gate, flickering gas lanterns and even a carriage house, this home most definitely reflects the spirit of new orleans. february, of course, also brings to mind Valentine’s Day, which inspired us to create a red-hot fashion story. Red is a color that never seems to go out of style, and we’ve captured it here, in every shade imaginable. and finally, as we celebrate the home, we pay homage to home cookin’. While we have some fabulous restaurants in our area, we should never overlook the value of a good, home-cooked meal. In this issue Gayle Guynup gayle.guynup@heraldtribune.com

Editor’s Note

The places I have called home<br /> <br /> As I started working on this Home and Garden annual issue, I couldn’t help but thin back on the many places I have called home.<br /> <br /> Born into a middle-class family in Miami, I have lived in nothing like the grand home we bring to you each month in the pages of Style.<br /> <br /> Still, I have loved each of the places I have called home, for a variety of reasons.The one with the most memories is the home I grew up in as a child — a two-stor structure in Bradenton. The first floor was occupied by the Nautilus, a shell and gift shop owned by my parents. At the end of the workday, my mom, dad, sister and I would simply “go home” to the second floor.<br /> <br /> It was odd in some ways. No yard — just a parking lot. No real front door. No neighborhood,per se, as it was right on U.S. 41. Yet it was fun — poking around the store at night, working the cash register when I was a little girl, waiting on customers when I was young enough to equate work with fun.<br /> <br /> I loved living in that big, old building. And I still have fond memories when I drive by it today. No longer a shell store, today it houses the Manatee County Humane Society,which seems only appropriate, don’t you think?<br /> <br /> The next place that held a special place in my heart was the apartment I rented when I worked in New York City. Knowing nothing about the various neighborhoods, I somehow landed in Brooklyn and found an apartment on the below-street-level floor of a brownstone owned by a professor at NYU.<br /> <br /> “Eureka,” I thought to myself. A one-bedroom apartment with hardwood floors, fireplaces in both the bedroom and living room, a claw-foot tub and a marble sink — all for $450 a month. (This was in 1980!)<br /> <br /> The question I didn’t ask was, “What’s the neighborhood like?” That question was<br /> answered for me about a week later when a taxi driver refused to take me home at 9 p.m. because, he said, it was too dangerous. While I did have my share of New York adventures, I loved that apartment every single day I was there.<br /> <br /> The other home that is nearest and dearest to my heart is my current one — the first home I ever owned. It’s a simple, ranch-style house, well suited for me and my three dogs. It is no mansion. It has no oversized bath, or big walk-in closets. But it is mine, and I love every inch of it.<br /> <br /> As you browse this Home and Garden annual, I hope you, too, will take a few moments to remember the homes that you have lived in and loved. Each one remains a part of us, no matter where we call home today.<br /> <br /> Yours, happy at home,

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