b Magazine Spring 2011 : Page 22

music the kind-ness of strangers WRITTEN BY Lori Myers S P E A K I N G W I T H SI N G E R -A AC T R E S S R O S L Y N KI N D O V E R T H E P H O NE is more like having a fun chat than a formal interview; more like gabbing with a friend you’ve known for years rather than someone whose voice you might only hear on recordings. Even from her home in Beverly Hills, she makes you feel like she’s right there with you in the same room. But even more endearing is the fact that she’s interested in finding more out about others than talking about herself. “I’ve been on your website,” she tells me. “I’d like to interview you.” Kind is talented, funny, sings like an angel, and prefers being called “Rozzie.” The fact that she’s Barbra Streisand’s younger half-sister (they had the same mother) is a footnote at this stage of her successful career. Kind established herself in show business long ago with a glorious voice that clearly runs in the family genes. Brooklyn-born and raised, Kind admits to being shy and overweight in her teens. So shy, in fact, that it took some effort to come out of her room at times. She loved to play pretend— “It’s a fun place to be,” she says—and would do things like create ballets to the song “Exodus.” Kind also discovered another way to escape and be in her world of pretend by going to the movies and watching stories flicker on the big screen. “I’d go to the early show and watch two features for 50 cents,” Kind recalls. “I’d get lost in the film as a kid. I liked being naive and having so much innocence.” She was the type of child, she says, who preferred being seen rather than heard. Those days are clearly over. Roslyn Kind shown with Ed Sullivan and Carol Lawrence When she was 14, an aunt took Kind to a diet doctor who helped transform the soon-to-be songstress and star from an insecure child to a sincere and forthright young woman. She then studied dance and sometimes wouldn’t get home until midnight after class. Kind officially entered the brutal world of entertainment on her graduation day from high school and came out with her first album called Give Me You. “I had a lot of things to conquer by going into show business,” Kind says. “Now if I stick my foot in my mouth, who cares!” Kind’s confidence grew as she began performing in the country’s top nightclubs and made three appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, which led up to her New York debut at the Plaza Hotel. Single recordings followed and her second album, photo courtesy of Scott Stander & Associates 22 „ ( b ) magazine | spr ing 2011 ( ( ) )

The Kind-Ness Of Strangers

Lori Myers

SPEAKING WITH SINGER-ACTRESS ROSLYN KIND OVER THE PHONE is more like having a fun chat than a formal interview; more like gabbing with a friend you’ve known for years rather than someone whose voice you might only hear on recordings.

Even from her home in Beverly Hills, she makes you feel like she’s right there with you in the same room. But even more endearing is the fact that she’s interested in finding more out about others than talking about herself.

“I’ve been on your website,” she tells me. “I’d like to interview you.”

Kind is talented, funny, sings like an angel, and prefers being called “Rozzie.” The fact that she’s Barbra Streisand’s younger half-sister (they had the same mother) is a footnote at this stage of her successful career. Kind established herself in show business long ago with a glorious voice that clearly runs in the family genes.

Brooklyn-born and raised, Kind admits to being shy and overweight in her teens. So shy, in fact, that it took some effort to come out of her room at times. She loved to play pretend— “It’s a fun place to be,” she says—and would do things like create ballets to the song “Exodus.”

Kind also discovered another way to escape and be in her world of pretend by going to the movies and watching stories flicker on the big screen. “I’d go to the early show and watch two features for 50 cents,” Kind recalls. “I’d get lost in the film as a kid. I liked being naive and having so much innocence.”

She was the type of child, she says, who preferred being seen rather than heard. Those days are clearly over.

When she was 14, an aunt took Kind to a diet doctor who helped transform the soon-to-be songstress and star from an insecure child to a sincere and forthright young woman. She then studied dance and sometimes wouldn’t get home until midnight after class. Kind officially entered the brutal world of entertainment on her graduation day from high school and came out with her first album called Give Me You.

“I had a lot of things to conquer by going into show business,” Kind says. “Now if I stick my foot in my mouth, who cares!”

Kind’s confidence grew as she began performing in the country’s top nightclubs and made three appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, which led up to her New York debut at the Plaza Hotel. Single recordings followed and her second album,

This is Roslyn Kind, proved she was a force to be reckoned with.

On Broadway, Kind starred in the musical 3 from Brooklyn. She also performed in off-Broadway productions of Show Me Where the Good Times Are, Leader of the Pack, and Ferguson the Tailor. Kind showed her versatile bicoastal appeal when she appeared in a Los Angeles production of William Finn’s Elegies. According to Kind’s bio, The Hollywood Reporter praised her performance by writing, “Roslyn Kind sings like a dream ...”

“As I developed, I became more of ‘Rozzie’ and not what people wanted,” Kind muses. “I stretched my wings and took a chance.”

Television came next and Kind’s credits on the small screen include the film Switched at Birth, multiple episodes of NBC’s Gimme a Break, and CBS’s The Nanny, where she played herself. Kind also performed the title song for the made-for-TV movie Not Just Another Affair. She is also remembered for her many talk show and variety show appearances, including the Tonight Show, The Merv Griffin Show, Saturday Night Live, Entertainment Tonight, Access Hollywood, and Good Morning America.

Beyond our national borders and across the pond, Kind has appeared on television shows in Canada and England. Going on to the big screen, she has had starring roles in films such as The Underachievers and I’m Going to Be Famous.

“I would love to do more acting,” Kind says. “I did a pilot with Shelley Long called Ghost of a Chance, but it didn’t get sold.”

But Kind has truly found her comfort zone in live performance and singing contemporary and pop tunes that speak to her. She chooses her songs carefully, looking for the personal story being told in the lyrics.

“Those stories are what fulfills me as a performer,” Kind says. “When I’m on stage I have a tendency to look for someone in the audience who needs attention. I look into their eyes and have them see me as a messenger of love and light. I’m people oriented when I perform. I think of myself as an instrument to spread the joy. I also kibitz with my audience and tell jokes.”

Laughter is important to Kind and she’s distressed by the increased alienation Of society. She wonders what happened to the wonderful innocence she knew as a little girl playing pretend in Brooklyn in the 1950s and ’60s. She wants to do more than sing a song or two; she wants her fans to leave her shows with smiles on their faces and perhaps a different view of the world.

“My friends think I should be a psychologist,” Kind laughs. “If everyone could love despite their differences. I had never known hatred when I was growing up in Brooklyn. I’ve always been accepted.”

Kind’s concern for others is evident even offstage. She has worked for Alzheimer’s and AIDS-related charitable organizations, including Broadway Cares Equity Fights AIDS, for which she contributed a song selection to Cabaret Noel, a volume in their annual series of holiday CD releases.

Kind also has helped various animal welfare groups and still experiences a special connection with her beloved Yorkshire terrier, Josh, who was euthanized due to illness in 2000. In past concerts, Kind has dedicated the song “At Times Like This” in Josh’s memory. During one particular show, Kind was singing the song and she noticed a little girl in the audience dancing.

“I was crying when I saw that,” Kind recalls. “I said to myself, ‘Okay, Joshie. I got your message.’”

When Kind isn’t performing, she loves watching old movies, particularly historical Biblical films, and likes to take brisk walks and runs around her Hollywood home. Life is good for this once-shy and insecure Brooklyn native.

“Happiness is so fleeting,” Kind says. “I learned to live in the moment.”

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/The+Kind-Ness+Of+Strangers/625461/58649/article.html.

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