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Haverford Fall 2010 : Page 4

main lines Separated by a gently sloping mound, the dorms will feature terraces and pathways at the lower level. Haverford to Build Two New Dorms H averford College alumnus Michael B. Kim ’85, through his foundation, the MBK Educational Foundation, has pledged $7.5 million toward construction of a new dormitory that will be sited adjacent to, and constructed in tandem with, another new dorm that received separate funding a year ago. News of the gift was announced in October, at the quarterly meeting of the College’s Board of Managers. Kim, who lives in Seoul, South Korea, has been a member of the Board since 2005. “This is a most welcome and important gift for many rea-HaverfordMagazine sons,” says Haverford President Stephen G. Emerson, who is also an alumnus of the College. “First and foremost, it reaffirms our commitment to ensuring vibrant student life at Haver-ford, and the role of living space in building a strong sense of community. Notably, we are not building in order to expand the size of the student body, but rather because we want to bet-ter accommodate the student body we already have, which has seen dorm living rooms become bedrooms during the gradual expansion that has taken place since 1978. The new dorms will also enable us to move many students up from the Haverford College Apartments and closer to the heart of campus.” “The Kim family is delight-ed to be contributing to the advancement of the College through the gift of the MBK Educational Foundation,” says Kim, founding partner of MBK Partners, one of Asia’s largest private equity firms. “We are particularly pleased that the Foundation’s gift will touch the lives of many students for years to come. This is an affir-mation of our belief in President Emerson’s vision of the College.” The gift comes a year after another Haverford College alumnus, Steven Jaharis ’82, made a challenge gift in sup-port of the other new dorm, to be named in honor of former Haverford President Tom Tritton. Groundbreaking for both buildings, on what is now a parking lot east of the Whitehead Campus Center, will occur next April. Ultimately, a total of 160 students will call the two dorms home beginning in September 2012. Concept and design work, which included extensive input from across the community, was conducted last year and came on the heels of the College’s comprehensive Master Planning process. The award-winning architectural firm of Tod Williams Billie Tsien channeled community input into an innovative design that takes its cues from Haver-ford’s enduring respect for community and the land on which this community thrives. A model shows the bridges that will connect the upper floors of the two-story buildings. 4

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<b>Haverford to Build Two New Dorms</b><br /> <br /> Haverford College alumnus Michael B. Kim ’85, through his foundation, the MBK Educational Foundation, has pledged $7.5 million toward construction of a new dormitory that will be sited adjacent to, and constructed in tandem with, another new dorm that received separate funding a year ago.<br /> <br /> News of the gift was announced in October, at the quarterly meeting of the College’s Board of Managers. Kim, who lives in Seoul, South Korea, has been a member of the Board since 2005.<br /> <br /> “This is a most welcome and important gift for many reasons,” says Haverford President Stephen G. Emerson, who is also an alumnus of the College. “First and foremost, it reaffirms our commitment to ensuring vibrant student life at Haverford, and the role of living space in building a strong sense of community. Notably, we are not building in order to expand the size of the student body, but rather because we want to better accommodate the student body we already have, which has seen dorm living rooms become bedrooms during the gradual expansion that has taken place since 1978. The new dorms will also enable us to move many students up from the Haverford College Apartments and closer to the heart of campus.”<br /> <br /> “The Kim family is delighted to be contributing to the advancement of the College through the gift of the MBK Educational Foundation,” says Kim, founding partner of MBK Partners, one of Asia’s largest private equity firms. “We are particularly pleased that the Foundation’s gift will touch the lives of many students for years to come. This is an affirmation of our belief in President Emerson’s vision of the College.”<br /> <br /> The gift comes a year after another Haverford College alumnus, Steven Jaharis ’82, made a challenge gift in support of the other new dorm, to be named in honor of former Haverford President Tom Tritton. Groundbreaking for both buildings, on what is now a parking lot east of the Whitehead Campus Center, will occur next April.<br /> <br /> Ultimately, a total of 160 students will call the two dorms home beginning in September 2012. Concept and design work, which included extensive input from across the community, was conducted last year and came on the heels of the College’s comprehensive Master Planning process. The award-winning architectural firm of Tod Williams Billie Tsien channeled community input into an innovative design that takes its cues from Haverford’s enduring respect for community and the land on which this community thrives.<br /> <br /> “Our plans for the new dormitories at Haverford are based upon the strong and simple premise that students can use the lay of the land to enter the lower and upper floors of these two-story buildings,” explains Billie Tsien. “A gently sloping mound separates the buildings, with planted retaining walls creating intimate terraces and pathways at the lower level. Bridges connect the upper floors to the top of the mound. The buildings and landscape work together and free up space so that it can be used to create larger and more positive social spaces for the students.<br /> <br /> “A central open courtyard in each building brings light, air, and a protected outdoor space for student use. Student lounges are located on either side of these courtyards, so when weather permits, large sliding glass doors can open to connect the inside to the outside. In this new complex, the buildings and the landscape will work together to form a sense of community that is contained and enhanced by nature.”<br /> <br /> —Chris Mills ’82<br /> <br /> <b>Doing the Right Thing</b><br /> <br /> It’s not often that founders of nonprofit organizations have the opportunity to walk the red carpet at a Hollywood awards ceremony. But this particular ceremony was tailor-made for <b>Mark Rembert ’07</b> and his fellow agents of social change.<br /> <br /> Rembert was one of five nominees for the 2010 Do Something Award, created by DoSomething.org, which recognizes world-changers ages 25 and under. The awards were announced in a ceremony held July 19 at the Hollywood Palladium and shown live by VH1. Rembert was honored for cofounding Energize Clinton County (ECC), which is helping strengthen the economic future of his hometown of Wilmington, Ohio, by creating green jobs and focusing on renewable energy.<br /> <br /> Although Rembert didn’t win the top prize of $100,000, he did receive a $10,000 grant from DoSomething as one of the five finalists. At the ceremony, he was introduced by actress Megan Fox, who also presented him with a trophy in the shape of a winged shoe.<br /> <br /> “It was a surreal experience,” says Rembert about his moment in the national spotlight. “It was great to receive so much encouragement and support.” In particular, he says he was moved by the effort and care VH1 put into helping the Do- Something finalists tell their stories to the world.<br /> <br /> It was also a big night for Wilmington, Ohio, which has lost 8,500 jobs since the departure of its largest employer, transportation company DHL Global. The town was featured in a video broadcast on the award show that described the history and success of Energize Clinton County. “It’s a community that’s still struggling, and faces many challenges, but people saw that it’s not a ‘depressed’ community in terms of its outlook on the world,” says Rembert, who hopes that the organization will help “redefine how communities work together in dealing with economic crises.” —Brenna McBride<br /> <br /> <b>The Class of 2014</b><br /> <br /> Among the many already accomplished members of our freshman class is a student who established a foundation to raise funds for tem- cell research and one who presented a paper at a national oralhistory symposium. We also have a nationally ranked competitive rock climber, a state champion fencer, an energy conservation crusader, and an all-state tenor. One young man took a year off after high school to curate an art exhibition and produce an accompanying coffee-table book, while another spent a gap year living in Japan, where he took a tea-ceremony course.<br /> <br /> “This year’s applicant pool was stronger than ever, making this perhaps the most difficult and challenging decision-making process in my time at Haverford,” says Dean of Admission Jess Lord. “The group that we chose to admit to the Class of 2014 collectively made an impression on us for being particularly outgoing, confident and creative, and for showing tremendous initiative. This class is just a remarkably diverse and interesting group of people, and we are thrilled to have them on campus now.”<br /> <br /> <b>Fresh Art</b><br /> <br /> The work of Philadelphia artists Steven and Billy Blaise Dufala has referenced lawn ornaments and holiday decorations, and used electrical conduit and discarded office furniture. Working collaboratively under the name Dufala Brothers, the duo has staged public races featuring tricycles made from reclaimed toilets and once rode a cardboard tank across downtown Philadelphia.<br /> <br /> What’s the connection? The Dufalas describe their creations as “cultural question marks” aimed at interrogating consumer culture by putting a spin on mundane objects. It’s all about challenging ideas, they say, “about what art is or can be.”<br /> <br /> The Dufalas brought their work to the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery Sept. 3 through Oct. 8 for an exhibition titled “Problemy.” The show, whose opening attracted a recordbreaking crowd, featured drawings, watercolors, digital prints and sculptures that probed ideas about the useful and the useless. Among the works on view: a vintage typewriter refitted with a BlackBerry keypad instead of keys; a comfy (looking) armchair and sofa made out of pink fiberglass insulation; an unwieldy pair of garden shears with huge handles but tiny blades; and a 15-footlong Chuck Taylor sneaker.<br /> <br /> One section of “Problemy” featured a “Free Wall” whose tacked-up sketches and doodles visitors were invited to take away with them. (Reports are that dorm rooms all over campus now feature work by the Dufalas.) The exhibition also spilled out of the gallery with two large-scale, site-specific outdoor sculptures.<br /> <br /> Outside the Whitehead Campus Center, the Dufalas, who both teach at their alma mater, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, installed an air-conditioning unit connected to metal ductwork that spelled out, in big block letters, the word “FRESH.” Across the road, next to the Orchard Parking Lot, the pair put another interesting twist on a familiar form, erecting a small, peaked-roof house made entirely out of chain-link fencing.<br /> <br /> Like much of their work, the house managed to appear both familiar and forbidding—a quality that came up for discussion during a well-attended gallery talk by the artists in September. Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Joshua Delpech-Ramey, who moderated the gallery event, described the Dufalas’ art as offering both “an invitation and a warning at the same time.” During a question- and-answer session, the brothers acknowledged that waste, excess and the reuse of materials are artistic concerns of theirs, but both resisted audience efforts to pigeonhole their witty work as a critique of consumerism or manifesto on sustainability. “I’m not authoritarian,” said Steven Dufala. “I don’t want to tell you what to think.”<br /> <br /> “Building on last year’s exhibition ‘Beautiful Human,’ ‘Problemy’ further strengthened Haverford’s growing connection to Philadelphia’s artistic community and expanded the College’s efforts to import challenging contemporary art into the classroom,” said Campus Exhibitions Coordinator Matthew Callinan.<br /> <br /> “Taking in the opening reception, the gallery conversation, multiple class visits, collaborative, interdisciplinary projects, and publications linked to the exhibition, ‘Problemy’ exemplifies the kind of multifaceted, crossdepartmental exhibition we’re hoping to develop further here at Haverford.” —Eils Lotozo, with reporting by Ellen Freeman ’11 and Hannah Garner ’12<br /> <br /> <b>There for Students: Haverford’s New Graduate Assistants</b><br /> <br /> New on campus this semester: Haverford’s first-ever Graduate Assistants in Campus Life. The two Gas, Michael Elias, who is pursuing an M.S. in higher education administration at Drexel University, and Latoya Johnson, who is enrolled in Temple University’s graduate program in urban education, live at the Haverford College Apartments, take their meals at the DC and work 20 hours per week, alternating weekends and weeknights on call.<br /> <br /> According to Dean of the College Martha Denney, the GA idea grew out of a series of meetings with counterparts at Bryn Mawr about ways health and psychological services might collaborate. What those points of connection might be are still being determined, says Denney, “But what we did realize in those conversation was that we both could use more resources for students needing help at night and on weekends. So we decided that we would each hire two graduate assistants. There will be some Bi-co collaboration and eventually they will share on-call duties across the campuses.”<br /> <br /> The Gas can offer crucial assistance, says Denney, when a student is sick, struggling with a psychological issue, or has had too much to drink. “We have deans and nurses on call, and we have Safety and Security, but the Gas are an additional presence. They can get out of bed in the middle of the night and help assess a situation, or just show up in someone’s room and say, “How are you doing?” That will be a good thing for our students.” Also being looked at are ways to utilize the Gas as liaisons to campus clubs and other student activities.<br /> <br /> “The Graduate Assistant position adds another layer of support for both the students and the administration,” says Johnson, who, with Elias, attended Customs Week as part of her training for the GA job. “I want the students to be able to approach the Gas when projects or issues arise,” says Elias, “and it’s already starting to happen.” —Eils Lotozo<br /> <br /> <b>IN THE NEWS</b><br /> <br /> <b>A CBS News moneywatch.com column</b> about the top 50 schools that produce science and engineering Ph.D.s revealed that Haverford came in at number 13. “What I found most interesting (but not surprising) is that the majority of these schools—28 of them—are liberal arts colleges,” wrote columnist Lynn O’Shaughnessy about the list, which was compiled by the National Science Foundation. Among the advantages of liberal arts colleges for science students, she noted: small classes, a chance to form connections with teachers, and “a far greater chance for undergraduate research.”<br /> <br /> <b>A June Philadelphia Inquirer article</b> titled “Amen for Racial Harmony” celebrated a concert program co-organized by Associate Professor of Music Thomas Lloyd that brought together the choir of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas and the Bucks County Choral Society. Lloyd, director of the Haverford and Bryn Mawr chamber singers and chorale, is artistic director of the Bucks County group.<br /> <br /> <b>In May, the New York Times published</b> a two-part follow-up to a 2005 series about athletic recruiting at small colleges that focused on Haverford College. In his update, sports writer Bill Pennington looked at how recruitment efforts have played out for the College and the role sports has played in the lives of some student athletes.<br /> <br /> <b>Haverford’s Descartes “discovery”</b> and return of the rare letter to the Institut de France in Paris was covered widely around the world. At last count, the story was picked up by more than 500 publications and websites around the world, and appeared in a half-dozen languages.<br /> <br /> <b>Boosting Bi-coCooperation</b><br /> <br /> Haverford and Bryn Mawr’s long association has included plenty of collaboration through the years. Along with shared academic offerings that allow Haverford students to take classes at Bryn Mawr and vice versa, the two colleges partner to run the Blue Bus and the Career Development Office, and, along with Swarthmore, they pool library resources through Tripod, the tri-college library catalogue.<br /> <br /> Earlier this year, the two schools took that teamwork to another level when they created a cooperative administrative structure for Dining Services and Safety and Security.<br /> <br /> Under the new system, Bryn Mawr’s Bernie Chung- Templeton now oversees the operations of a combined Haverford/Bryn Mawr Dining Services, while Haverford’s long-time director of Safety and Security, Tom King, now has oversight of both campus security forces.<br /> <br /> The changes are part of efforts at both schools to make operating dollars go farther. “The new arrangement allows Haverford and Bryn Mawr to split the salaries of the two directors and also provides efficiencies in other areas,” says Vice President for Finance and Administration G. Richard Wynn. With Safety and Security under King, says Wynn, the schools now share a training officer who works with personnel on both campuses. While the schools continue to maintain separate patrols, increased cross-training enables officers to fill in where and when needed, providing a larger labor pool and reducing overtime costs. In the future, Wynn says, the partnership will investigate purchasing a new dispatch system jointly. “Radio dispatch systems are expensive to replace,” he says. “By combining ours, we’ll save on software, maintenance and staff.”<br /> <br /> Haverford and Bryn Mawr’s dining services had already enjoyed a certain level of cooperation before the change in administrative structure, having done joint menu planning and joint purchasing for years. Still, at Haverford, where John Francone remains director of the Dining Center, Chung- Templeton is already playing a role, says Wynn. “She’s been involved in an assessment of our operations and in the renovation of the Dining Center, which is a particular place we expect to realize savings.”<br /> <br /> One area where Chung- Templeton can provide expertise, he says, is in helping Haverford use more student workers in the Dining Center. “Bryn Mawr has always relied heavily on students for their DC, and we have not. We are now in the process of moving toward that kind of system. However, it will be a slow transition. We will not do it at the expense of our long-time regular employees, but will phase in more student workers as positions open up through attrition.”<br /> <br /> Haverford is also looking for ways to increase bi- and tricollege cooperation in the technological realm, according to Chief Information Officer Joe Spadaro. “The three presidents have asked the three CIOs how we can work together on technology to provide a seamless academic experience,” say Spadaro, who became Haverford’s CIO in February.<br /> <br /> Haverford and Bryn Mawr took a step toward that goal when they launched a common authentication system at the start of the fall semester. The new system allows students, whether at Bryn Mawr or Haverford, to use the same streamlined log-in procedure to access secure internal sites, including that of the Registrar’s Office and Blackboard, the course management system that instructors use to post syllabi, readings and assignments. “This is going to make it easier and more convenient to move from place to place,” says Spadaro, who meets monthly with his counterparts at Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore.<br /> <br /> Another area the colleges have been discussing as a possible arena for collaboration is what is known as Enterprise Resource Planning, computerbased systems that centralize the management of all data associated with a business or organization. Haverford needs to replace its patchwork of administrative programs and software—which now manage such things as finances, grades, course registration and alumni records—with a new system. The question is, says Spadaro, “Are there additional ways we could collaborate with our peers?”<br /> <br /> It’s not clear yet how that might play out in the future, but Spadaro and Bryn Mawr’s CIO, Elliott Shore, have been looking closely at how the two schools might share resources in the short term. “I guess you could say we’re developing a mutualaid pact,” he says. “One way we’ve been talking about saving and helping each other is through the staffing decisions we make. For example, we need to hire a network person, and we’ve been thinking that if we hire someone with security experience, we could share that expertise with Bryn Mawr.” —Eils Lotozo<br /> <br /> <b>Pride and Prejudice on College Lane</b><br /> <br /> Haverford College may not be the obvious choice as the setting for a romance novel, but it works for author Abigail Reynolds, whose new book, The Man Who Loved Pride & Prejudice, features a marine-biologist heroine who happens to be a Haverford College professor.<br /> <br /> Cassie Boulton is a beauty with a “no-nonsense exterior and quick wit” who spends her summers doing research in Woods Hole, Mass. There she meets novelist Calder Westing III, scion of a famous, Kennedylike political clan. He follows her to Haverford, where he applies for a writer-in-residence post. As love ensues, is thwarted, and finally conquers all, Cassie takes Calder on a stroll to the Duck Pond, teaches a section of Bio 101, gets a paper published in the journal Advances in Marine Biology, and is grilled about her paramour at a faculty meeting.<br /> <br /> The book’s tagline describes it as “a modern love story with a Jane Austen twist.” Reynolds is wellknown to fans of the booming genre of Jane Austeninspired fiction for her Pemberley Variations series, which explores “the roads not taken” in Pride and Prejudice.<br /> <br /> So how did she come to choose Haverford as a locale for this novel?<br /> <br /> It turns out Abigail Reynolds is really the pen name of Asja Margulis, Bryn Mawr College Class of 1981. “For plot purposes, I needed a prestigious college with a strong undergraduate tradition within driving distance of Washington, D.C., but not located in the South or on the coast,” wrote Margulis in an email. “I attended Bryn Mawr during the heyday of bi-college cooperation and knew Haverford well, so it didn’t require research to describe accurately. I didn’t want to complicate the issue by bringing in the question of women’s colleges, so Bryn Mawr wasn’t an option. Haverford’s Quaker tradition of independence was also important because I needed an administration that wouldn’t cave under political pressure.” (The plot features some nefarious scheming by Calder’s senator father to quash the relationship with Cassie, whom he sees as below his family’s station.)<br /> <br /> Margulis, a physician with a part-time practice who lives in Wisconsin with her husband and two teenage children, says the choice of Haverford as the place where Cassie teaches is significant for another reason.<br /> <br /> “One of the themes in the book is about the value of undergraduate education at liberal arts colleges vs. large universities. Cassie chooses to teach at Haverford rather than pursue a research position because she values the opportunity to teach students how to think rather than supervise graduate research by singleminded scientists, and there are spirited discussions and a number of jokes between the main characters on this subject.” —Eils Lotozo<br /> <br /> <b>GOING GREEN</b><br /> <br /> Haverford College is <b>saving gas</b> with its new IT car. The bright red “Utility” model, which was donated to the college by Samuel Freeman ’97, is a zero-emission, electric, lowspeed vehicle (LSV) meant for urban, recreational and light commercial markets such as planned communities, resorts, industrial complexes and universities. The vehicle is being used by Facilities Management staff.<br /> <br /> The College has signed on as a <b>charter participant</b> in the new Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS). Developed by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, STARS offers a transparent self-reporting framework to help colleges and universities gauge their progress on sustainability. The new system provides a common set of measurements, creates incentives for improvement and aids information sharing about sustainability practices. STARS participants report data to earn credits and may receive a rating level of bronze, silver, gold or platinum. More information at stars.aashe.org<br /> <br /> Facilities Management has <b>replaced 159 showerheads</b> in the dormitories and Athletic Center. The old showerheads used 2.5 gallons of water per minute. The new heads use just 1.5 gallons per minute.<br /> <br /> After a successful experiment with <b>“Trayless Tuesdays”</b> during the last academic year, and thanks to a push from students who championed the issue, the Dining Center is eliminating trays. Going trayless is expected to help reduce food waste by an estimated 25-30 percent and save the college $27,000 per year in energy, water, detergent and labor costs.<br /> <br /> <b>Postcards from Abroad<br /> <br /> An ongoing blog hosted by the Office of International Academic Programs</b><br /> <br /> Maya Barlev ’12, who is at the University of Hawaii at Manoa this fall, posted this entry about meeting Daniel Dae Kim ’90 at the premiere of Hawaii Five-O: … I ended up watching behind the screen where there was more room, and where I knew the VIPs and celebrities had to pass to make their way out. After the show, (which was awesome, by the way), I yelled out to Daniel Dae Kim saying “DANIEL! I’m a Haverford Student! Please can I get a picture with you?” He was nice enough to stop and say cheese.<br /> <br /> <b>More postcards at haverford.edu/blogs</b><br /> <br /> <b>Student Garden Takes Root</b><br /> <br /> Andrew Bostick ’12 first began thinking about food and politics in high school, when he read Michael Pollen’s book The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Bostick’s interest in the subject deepened at Haverford, thanks to an internship funded by the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship that sent him to southern France to study organic farming practices. Over eight weeks in the summer of 2009, the internship gave him the chance to live and work on French farms and consider environmentalism through an agricultural lens.<br /> <br /> That experience made him want to find a way to explore those ideas on campus. So Bostick teamed up with Peter Block ’11 and Fay Strongin ’10, who had also completed CPGC-funded agricultural internships, to create the Haverford Garden Initiative (HGI). HGI broke ground on its first initiative in the spring: a campus vegetable garden meant to provide space for sustainable food production and education.<br /> <br /> The vegetable garden is located next to the Haverford College Apartments, in a spot where EHAUS, a student co-op that tries to live sustainably, gardened in the past. HGI doubled the size of the old EHAUS plot and added many new crops, including potatoes, onions, peas, spinach, peppers, radishes, tomatoes, green beans, three types of lettuce, beets, cucumbers and herbs. “It turns out that even a small plot of land, when nurtured well, can produce a lot of food,” says Bostick.<br /> <br /> Thanks to another CPGC internship, Bostick was able to spend the summer maintaining the garden with a group of HGI-affiliated students living on campus. He also met with professors, students and staff members, researched other college garden programs, and wrote a proposal for making the garden a permanent fixture at Haverford.<br /> <br /> “Interest in food and food politics has exploded over the past few years,” says Bostick. “Whether motivated by the threat of global warming, by the possibility of carcinogens in the food supply, or by the ethical treatment of animals, people have started thinking about food a lot.”<br /> <br /> HGI’s major communityoutreach event of the summer was a garden party open to all students on campus. With funding from Haverford’s Committee for Environmental Responsibility and help from Dining Center Director John Francone, the event offered a buffet of fresh-from-the-garden salads and grilled vegetables, along with ribs and turkey sausage, as well as garden tours and a raffle of newly harvested vegetables.<br /> <br /> President Steve Emerson accepted Bostick’s garden proposal in September and Students’ Council gave HGI funding to buy tools, seeds and materials to build raised beds. HGI will also be expanding to use land behind Cadbury House for larger crops and is seeking space to plant fruit trees. “We are trying to establish as many places on campus as possible to produce food,” says Bostick.<br /> <br /> Haverford Grounds Manager Claudia Kent will serve as an informal adviser to HGI, offering ideas and directions for the garden, and two paid positions have been created for student co-heads, who will be responsible for maintaining the garden and recruiting volunteers to help. The members of HGI will break into small garden teams, and all students will have access to the produce.<br /> <br /> A standing CPGC internship is in the works that will provide funding for a different student to work in the garden each summer and conduct a related academic research project.<br /> <br /> There is also a Haverford Garden Wiki, which will serve as a teaching tool to prepare novice gardeners for their time in the garden. With this organizational structure and HGI’s successful recruitment of around 40 underclassmen this fall, the future of the student garden looks promising.<br /> <br /> Bostick believes the garden has become as much about the people involved as it is about the food. “Unlike the highly individualized work we do in school, the garden has taught us to function well as a team, planting seedlings, harvesting produce and even painting signs,” he says. “The garden truly seems to be fulfilling its role as the space where people can think creatively and act decisively about food and its importance.” —Heather Harden ’11<br /> <br /> <b>STATE OF THE COLLEGE OFFICE OF THE PROVOST</b><br /> <br /> In June, Haverford College received formal notice that it had been granted unqualified reaccreditation and commendation from the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. This news was greeted enthusiastically by the community, which had come together over the last 2½ years to discuss, deliberate, compile and write the self-study document that comprised our comprehensive report and assessment on the State of the College. Indeed, more than 50 faculty members, students, staff and administrators had worked as a team in writing the self-study document, which addressed in detail the College’s many strengths and accomplishments, and its goals and opportunities in the next decade. Organized according to the 14 standards that the commission uses to evaluate an institution for reaccreditation, the Haverford self-study report reaffirms our commitment to educating the whole student, fostering a unique campus community, emphasizing close studentfaculty interaction and focusing on a superior undergraduate education and original scholarship as core vehicles for preparing our students for lives of accomplishment, service and leadership.<br /> <br /> Our report to Middle States was organized around the theme of “Institutional Vision,” a useful tool for highlighting both the significant changes in administrative leadership and the comprehensive efforts directed toward large-scale institutional planning over the last several years. Since the last reaccreditation review a decade earlier, the College has appointed a new president (2007), provost (2007), vice president for institutional advancement (2008), dean of the college (2009), and dean of admissions and financial aid (2004), and has created the new vice presidential post of chief information officer (2009). Our educational vision has been refined and rearticulated by an academic strategic-planning process that began in an intensive way in 2005. The process has focused on the effectiveness of the overall curriculum and the allocation of faculty time across teaching, mentoring, service and scholarship.<br /> <br /> The “Blueprint for Haverford’s Future,” endorsed by the Board of Managers in 2008, is our institutional vision for the future of academic excellence at Haverford. The blueprint arose from an extensive multiyear process of critical inquiry in which faculty and students considered the steps we would need to take to offer the sharpest, deepest and most engaging curriculum, and identify the resources necessary to move the College in this direction. Finally, a physical strategic plan for the College was articulated through a campus master- planning process that concluded in 2009. Enveloped in the strategic planning that has occurred at multiple levels of the College, the Middle States document is best understood as a comprehensive articulation of Haverford’s core institutional goals and aspirations.<br /> <br /> Institutions of higher education such as Haverford have been increasingly challenged to document, through directassessment metrics, their successes and progress. Haverford’s self-study report included an assessment component for each of the Middle States reaccreditation standards, driven by a close examination of our institutional mission. While reaffirming in clear and precise terms what Haverford does well, we challenged ourselves to meet the objectives of the strategic-planning initiatives over the next 10-year period with a set of discrete recommendations that the community will be asked to reexamine, refine and eventually implement. These recommendations largely centered on four key themes: implementing Haverford’s strategic academic plan (“The Blueprint for Haverford’s Future”); enhancing the resources to support underprepared and underrepresented students; enhancing technology and mechanisms for the assessment of institutional effectiveness and student learning; and examining and refining our self-governance system and institutional organization.<br /> <br /> We will need to report back to Middle States in 10 years, during our next reaccreditation review, on the progress we have made in achieving the specific recommendations in these core areas. Never resting, always challenging, we have already begun the process of discussing and implementing key recommendations this fall. Our culture of deliberation and consensus-based decision making ensures that this will be a widely deliberative and thoughtful process, and that ultimately, it will benefit the College in the years ahead. I look forward to participating in the various discussions that will take place over the next several years as we begin to implement the academic strategic plan of the College and the various self-directed recommendations that were integral to our successful Middle States reaccreditation review.<br /> <br /> —Linda Bell, Provost<br /> <br /> <b>Record-breaking Summer for CPGC Internships</b><br /> <br /> They taught school in rural Costa Rica, promoted AIDS education in Kenya and worked with a health service in Nicaragua. Four students spent the summer teaching English in China, four others interned at a hospital in India, and six did research in Indonesia. They also worked on a union campaign in Chicago, helped at a Planned Parenthood Clinic in Philadelphia, and researched healthcare issues in Boston.<br /> <br /> All told, 72 students from Haverford and Bryn Mawr benefited from internships provided by Haverford’s Center for Peace and Global Citizenship this summer. This was the highest number in the program’s history, according to Parker Snowe ’79, director of the CPGC. Snowe credited a substantial increase in applicants to improved marketing of the internship program, which allows students to explore social justice issues by working with nonprofit organizations in the U.S. and around the world. The CPGC got out the word about the program with information sessions held throughout the academic year, and, says Snowe, “We also targeted faculty whose teaching and research dovetailed with our mission, and asked them to encourage their students to consider applying for CPGC internships to augment their in-class learning.”<br /> <br /> For Nathan Shelton ’11, a sociology and linguistics major, his summer internship gave him the opportunity to work in Paraguay with National Geographic’s Enduring Voices Project, which aims to preserve endangered languages. Shelton, who collaborated with a Paraguayan scholar to organize recording sessions of the endangered language of the Chamacoco people, is deeply interested in language use and its social implications. “In West Virginia, my home, I have seen the stigmatization and division of people based on particular speech patterns,” Shelton says.<br /> <br /> “These sorts of stigmas based on language use and other cultural practices are the bases of larger divisions in the society. I hope that by working on giving some legitimacy and attention to a language ‘on the edge,’ we can promote a broader, more inclusive cultural perspective.”<br /> <br /> Rose Howse ’11 spent the summer teaching English in Colima, Mexico, with the group Project Amigo. Howse is aiming for a career in public education and she believes her internship will help her in that pursuit, having given her both valuable general experience and “the Spanish skills to better communicate with the growing population of Spanish-speaking families in the United States.”<br /> <br /> A number of CPGC interns blogged about their experiences throughout the summer. To read their observations, go to haverford.edu/blogs.<br /> <br /> <b>Haverford’s Board of Managers Welcomes Two New Alumni Members</b><br /> <br /> <b>Paul Zoidis ’81</b> worked at Lehman Brothers for 18 years, serving as managing director, head of Global Communication & Media Investment Banking, and as a member of the firm’s management committee. Since retiring from Lehman in 2005, he has served as vice president of the Westfield United Fund, where he manages a tutoring program for underprivileged children, and is on the board of the First Tee of Metropolitan New York, which runs youth education programs and promotes character development through the game of golf. Zoidis is a member of Haverford’s newly formed Campaign Planning Committee. He is one of several Zoidis family members to attend Haverford; others include brother Mark ’85, father-in-law Perk Pedrick ’58, and daughter Elizabeth Zoidis ’11.<br /> <br /> <b>Seth P. Bernstein ’84</b> is managing director and head of Global Fixed Income and Currency at J.P. Morgan Asset Management in New York City, where he has worked since graduating from Haverford. Bernstein, who was a political science and economics major, is also a trustee of the Citizens Budget Commission of New York and a member of the Economics Club of New York. He lives in New York City with his wife, Toni, and three children: Hilary is in her third year at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, Samuel is a freshman at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, and Max is a sophomore at the Horace Mann School in New York.

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