Tucson Lifestyle Home and Garden February 2017 : Page 18

Bringing It All Home This gallery owner’s house showcases the work of her favorite artists. BY KURT NIECE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN STANCLIFF O Owning a gallery is one of the hardest jobs you’ll ever love. Along with the usual demands of running a business, there’s an added challenge — it’s difficult not to fall in love with the art. Restraint becomes a learned skill. Keep the work in the gallery, even though you know that one special piece would look great in the living room. Gallery owner Lori Kirkpatrick exer-cised admirable discipline at her retail storefront Dos Corazones, but a few of the very special pieces gravitated homeward. “The first couple of years I was scared to take anything home because when you’re starting out, you want to make sure things sell and that you have artwork for other people’s homes. This year I was finally able to do mine. “I found a lot of artists who are one-of-a-kind and unique to the store, so I have favorites at my house. I’m especially fond of the work of Pam Corbett.” Lori’s story began when she moved from Nebraska nine years ago. Work brought her to Tucson but the landscape enticed her to stay. “I never imagined I’d like the high des-ert but I fell in love with it. My kids had all graduated from college, starting their careers and I knew this was a good time to try something new. “I met my husband Terry in Tubac. He’s the other heart of Dos Corazones. He worked for the government, but he’s retired now and runs the cigar shop Grumpy Gringo Fine Cigars. He’s got quite a story here, too,” she says with a laugh. Upon entering Lori and Terry’s home, the first impression is of color — liber-ated and profuse. The door is unadorned, lightly stained, two-panel wood, recessed in a narrow, barrel-vaulted entryway. The surround and walls are intricately painted, a nice foil to the simplicity of the door. ABOVE The artisan pieces in the kitchen of Lori and Terry Kirkpatrick’s Tubac residence have been col-lected over many years. Others appear throughout the home. The chile painting was a vintage find. 18 T ucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / FEBR UAR Y 2017 TucsonLifestyle.com

Bringing It All Home

Kurt Niece

This gallery owner’s house showcases the work of her favorite artists.

Owning a gallery is one of the hardest jobs you’ll ever love. Along with the usual demands of running a business, there’s an added challenge — it’s difficult not to fall in love with the art. Restraint becomes a learned skill. Keep the work in the gallery, even though you know that one special piece would look great in the living room.

Gallery owner Lori Kirkpatrick exercised admirable discipline at her retail storefront Dos Corazones, but a few of the very special pieces gravitated homeward.

“The first couple of years I was scared to take anything home because when you’re starting out, you want to make sure things sell and that you have artwork for other people’s homes. This year I was finally able to do mine.

“I found a lot of artists who are one-ofa- kind and unique to the store, so I have favorites at my house. I’m especially fond of the work of Pam Corbett.”

Lori’s story began when she moved from Nebraska nine years ago. Work brought her to Tucson but the landscape enticed her to stay.

“I never imagined I’d like the high desert but I fell in love with it. My kids had all graduated from college, starting their careers and I knew this was a good time to try something new.

“I met my husband Terry in Tubac. He’s the other heart of Dos Corazones. He worked for the government, but he’s retired now and runs the cigar shop Grumpy Gringo Fine Cigars. He’s got quite a story here, too,” she says with a laugh.

Upon entering Lori and Terry’s home, the first impression is of color — liberated and profuse. The door is unadorned, lightly stained, two-panel wood, recessed in a narrow, barrel-vaulted entryway. The surround and walls are intricately painted, a nice foil to the simplicity of the door.

A half wall separates the formal dining room from the entrance. The dining room, while arguably the most formal space in the house, remains playful. It features a coved ceiling painted a dark Carolina Blue; the paint-washed walls are a complementary color of Honey Gold. Lori is no slouch when it comes to utilizing the intricacies of the color wheel.

Three layers of stacked terra cotta roofing tiles divide the gold and blue with earthy tones of red clay. It’s a clever and beautiful visual device that gives lift to the cove.

The dining tabletop is rustic and darkly stained wood with a base that’s cerulean blue. Four chairs and an upholstered bench surround it. Two of the chairs are special standouts. Though traditional in silhouette, they are upholstered in blue leather and echo the ceiling cove, table base and the fabric upholstery of the bench. However, the chair backs are done in a fabric that picks up the color, hue and pattern of a conventional red and blue Oriental rug placed under the table. The overall effect is bold yet seamless, and though unexpected, in no way jarring.

A 12-light, massive iron chandelier floats over the table. It’s another strong presence but again, does not dominate.

The powder room is another safe zone for those who flee from beige. Venetian red walls and ceiling create a vibrant background to a distressed, verdigris-colored antique armoire, and a richly carved dark wood basin stand. Painted wooden animal heads are positioned above the sink. The mosaic-leaded mirror is shifted to a side wall, diverging from traditional bathroom staging. There’s a subtle sense of humor here, too — looking up from the sink to gaze at a carved bullhead that’s gazing right back just makes you smile.

The master bedroom is a sanctuary of calm. Deep sapphire blue walls and a light, steel-color ceiling invite rest. But the saffron comforter hints at tomorrow’s sunrise and a new day.

Hexagonal terra cotta floor tiles run the entirety of the home, bringing flow, continuity and a sense of tradition and groundedness. Eventually one is led to the courtyard and the landscape that first beguiled Lori.

Mesquite trees reach to a bright, endlessly blue Arizona sky beyond the terra cotta-hued walls, and an outdoor fireplace beckons on a chilly winter evening. It’s stuccoed and painted a color that’s hard to define: not quite eggplant and not exactly Egyptian blue. The fireplace is precisely the right color to underscore blue skies, sage green mesquites and the warm earth tone of the walls.

It’s easy to imagine the Kirkpatricks by the fire with a good cigar and margaritas. The outdoor area is designed for friends and laughter or sharing a quiet evening with an Arizona sunset.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Bringing+It+All+Home/2695827/377243/article.html.

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