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Golfweek Comp Issue November 21, 2014 : Page 8

T he F orecaddie The Man ouT FronT Kang is the queen of aces The LPGA’s Danielle Kang has a new nickname: Ace Queen. Two aces in consecutive weeks to the tune of two brand new cars will do that. Lizette Salas, one of Kang’s closest friends on tour, was on the tee box when Kang collected her second hole-in-one (and prize vehicle) in Taiwan to win an Audi A6. Salas was so miffed that she backed off her own tee shot twice. “I was yelled at more than congratulated by players,” Kang told The Forecaddie. Kang, 22, has had eight aces in her lifetime, including four this year. The first of 2014 came in April at the par-3 course at Sherwood Lake Club; the second arrived eight days later at the Lotte Championship in Hawaii. The two-time U.S. Women’s Amateur champ made her first hole-in-one at age 13, holing a 3-wood from 186 yards. As for the latest two, Kang used an 8-iron from 155 yards to win her first car in China (a Buick) and a 7-iron from 158 yards to claim the second. “I’m cashing the Buick LaCrosse, and the Audi is still being talked over right now on my options,” Kang told TMOF. “But my brother Alex will have an Audi no matter what.” Nice sister. As for Kang, she drives a Porsche Cayenne at home in Westlake Village, Calif. But golf’s Ace Queen might look into expanding her garage. courTeSy oF Danielle kang (via TwiTTer) Danielle kang’s in the driver’s seat when it comes to aces with prizes attached. She won two cars for recent holes-in-one. course designers salute Pete and alice Some people grow up but never quite leave the sand box. Maybe that’s why The Forecaddie had so much fun during a three-day Golfweek event honoring Pete and Alice Dye at South Carolina’s Kiawah Island Golf Resort. Actually, it was more like a roast, with former colleagues and associates of the Dyes telling stories of their many years building courses for the two. Pete, 88, and Alice, 87, were in fine fettle for the occasion, soaking up the praise and telling tales from their pioneer days in 1950s suburban Indianapolis. Both were fine amateur golfers working in insurance sales – and they found a way Pete and to build a homegrown course-design alice Dye business into an enterprise that helped transform the face of American golf. Deane Beman, a former PGA Tour commissioner, recalled how Pete managed to tame a north Florida swamp in the late 1970s to create the TPC Sawgrass facility. Nelson Caron, superintendent at Ford Plantation in Richmond Hill, Ga., showed images of Pete on his hands and knees last year as he laid out ideas for renovating the golf course that he had opened 25 years earlier. Architect Bobby Weed, who ran the project at Long Cove on Hilton Head Island, S.C. more than 30 years ago, talked about Pete’s work ethic – rousing the crew at 5:30 a.m. and working them hard through 90-degree heat and exhausting physical labor. Tom Doak was on that Long Cove crew as a field hand at $4 per hour, and he paid homage to the generosity of spirit in which Dye shared everything he knew. “There were no trade secrets,” said Doak, a fine architect himself. In an era when detailed plans and documentation were the basis for a construction crew, the Dyes revolutionized golf – or at least turned back the clock to a more classical era. Insurance’s loss has been golf’s huge gain. golFweek PhoTo/Tracy wilcox 8 Golfweek . November 21, 2014 . golfweek.com

Kang Is The Queen Of Aces

The LPGA’s Danielle Kang has a new nickname:

Ace Queen.

Two aces in consecutive weeks to the tune of two brand new cars will do that. Lizette Salas, one of Kang’s closest friends on tour, was on the tee box when Kang collected her second hole-in-one (and prize vehicle) in Taiwan to win an Audi A6. Salas was so miffed that she backed off her own tee shot twice.

“I was yelled at more than congratulated by players,” Kang told The Forecaddie.

Kang, 22, has had eight aces in her lifetime, including four this year. The first of 2014 came in April at the par-3 course at Sherwood Lake Club; the second arrived eight days later at the Lotte Championship in Hawaii. The two-time U.S. Women’s Amateur champ made her first hole-in-one at age 13, holing a 3-wood from 186 yards.

As for the latest two, Kang used an 8-iron from 155 yards to win her first car in China (a Buick) and a 7-iron from 158 yards to claim the second.

“I’m cashing the Buick LaCrosse, and the Audi is still being talked over right now on my options,” Kang told TMOF. “But my brother Alex will have an Audi no matter what.”

Nice sister. As for Kang, she drives a Porsche Cayenne at home in Westlake Village, Calif. But golf’s Ace Queen might look into expanding her garage.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Kang+Is+The+Queen+Of+Aces/1864330/234800/article.html.

Course Designers Salute Pete And Alice

Some people grow up but never quite leave the sand box. Maybe that’s why The Forecaddie had so much fun during a three-day Golfweek event honoring Pete and Alice Dye at South Carolina’s Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

Actually, it was more like a roast, with former colleagues and associates of the Dyes telling stories of their many years building courses for the two. Pete, 88, and Alice, 87, were in fine fettle for the occasion, soaking up the praise and telling tales from their pioneer days in 1950s suburban Indianapolis. Both were fine amateur golfers working in insurance sales – and they found a way to build a homegrown course-design business into an enterprise that helped transform the face of American golf.

Deane Beman, a former PGA Tour commissioner, recalled how Pete managed to tame a north Florida swamp in the late 1970s to create the TPC Sawgrass facility. Nelson Caron, superintendent at Ford Plantation in Richmond Hill, Ga., showed images of Pete on his hands and knees last year as he laid out ideas for renovating the golf course that he had opened 25 years earlier. Architect Bobby Weed, who ran the project at Long Cove on Hilton Head Island, S.C. more than 30 years ago, talked about Pete’s work ethic – rousing the crew at 5:30 a.m. and working them hard through 90-degree heat and exhausting physical labor. Tom Doak was on that Long Cove crew as a field hand at $4 per hour, and he paid homage to the generosity of spirit in which Dye shared everything he knew. “There were no trade secrets,” said Doak, a fine architect himself.

In an era when detailed plans and documentation were the basis for a construction crew, the Dyes revolutionized golf – or at least turned back the clock to a more classical era. Insurance’s loss has been golf’s huge gain.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Course+Designers+Salute+Pete+And+Alice/1864332/234800/article.html.

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