M Milwaukees Lifestyle Magazine August 2013 : Page 61

SPECIAL SECTION: MEDICAL GUIDE SPECIALTY GUIDE To help you fi nd the medical specialist who meets your needs, we’ve chosen 21 common medical specialties and included the local hospitals and clinics that concentrate on these areas. This list was compiled through staff research and with the help of health care organizations and hospitals. We’ve attempted to be as thorough as possible and regret if a listing has been over-looked or if information has changed since press time. CLINICS MEDICAL Meeting the Health Care COMPILED BY MELISSA MCGRAW WISCONSIN’S MEDICAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS PREP FOR THE GROWING NEED FOR MEDICAL CARE BY CATHY BREITENBUCHER ALLERGY/ASTHMA Allergic Diseases S.C. Milwaukee, (414) 545-1111 For years experts have warned that a doc-tor shortage is looming. One estimate is that by 2020, the United States will have 45,000 too few primary care physicians and 46,000 too few sur-geons and medical specialists. It’s happening at precisely the wrong time. Our population is growing. Obesity-related problems such as diabetes and heart disease are on the rise. Aging baby boomers will need every-thing from knee replacement to Alzheimer’s care. Meanwhile, about 32 million Americans will gain insurance coverage under President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, with many provi-sions of the law taking effect in 2014. Who is going to take care of us all? “I would send a message of reassurance to The doctor will see you now — or maybe not. patients that despite the complexity of the chang-es that are happening and the dramatic nature of some of them, health care is going to continue to be rendered here in a high-quality way,” says Dr. John Raymond, CEO and president of the Medical College of Wisconsin. The health care system probably will feel some strain when newly insured patients get catch-up care they previously had been unable to access, Raymond notes. “Certainly, longer wait times are possible,” he adds. Susan E. Cashin isn’t pushing the panic but-ton, either. She is interim assistant dean of stu-dent affairs for the College of Health Sciences at UW-Milwaukee. “I don’t anticipate, ‘You can’t see your doctor for a month,’ or ‘We don’t have your labs ready,’” she says. “At this point, I don’t anticipate a hole so Allergy & Asthma Centers S.C. Greenfi eld, (414) 281-0404 Milwaukee, (414) 475-9101 Waukesha, (262) 542-2505 Allergy & Asthma Clinic of Wisconsin S.C. Greenfi eld, (414) 271-4204 Mequon, (414) 271-4204 Milwaukee, (414) 271-4204 Milwaukee-Capitol Drive, (414) 271-4204 Waukesha, (414) 271-4204 Allergy Research & Care Glendale, (414) 352-0084 Wauwatosa, (414) 352-0084 Allergy, Asthma & Sinus Center Greenfi eld, (414) 529-8500 Mukwonago, (262) 363-6880 Medical Guide 2013 | M 61

Medical Guide

Cathy Breitenbucher

Meeting the Health Care Challenge

WISCONSIN’S MEDICAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS PREP FOR THE GROWING NEED FOR MEDICAL CARE

The doctor will see you now — or maybe not.

For years experts have warned that a doctor shortage is looming. One estimate is that by 2020, the United States will have 45,000 too few primary care physicians and 46,000 too few surgeons and medical specialists.

It’s happening at precisely the wrong time.

Our population is growing. Obesity-related problems such as diabetes and heart disease are on the rise. Aging baby boomers will need everything from knee replacement to Alzheimer’s care.

Meanwhile, about 32 million Americans will gain insurance coverage under President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, with many provisions of the law taking effect in 2014.

Who is going to take care of us all?

“I would send a message of reassurance to patients that despite the complexity of the changes that are happening and the dramatic nature of some of them, health care is going to continue to be rendered here in a high-quality way,” says Dr. John Raymond, CEO and president of the Medical College of Wisconsin.

The health care system probably will feel some strain when newly insured patients get catch-up care they previously had been unable to access, Raymond notes. “Certainly, longer wait times are possible,” he adds.

Susan E. Cashin isn’t pushing the panic button, either. She is interim assistant dean of student affairs for the College of Health Sciences at UW-Milwaukee.

“I don’t anticipate, ‘You can’t see your doctor for a month,’ or ‘We don’t have your labs ready,’” she says. “At this point, I don’t anticipate a hole so huge it will hurt the health of our community.”

People should expect, however, to get more of their medical care from someone without “M.D.” after his or her name, local experts say.

A physician assistant or nurse practitioner might become a patient’s day-to-day caregiver. Others who can help take the burden off doctors include nurses, dentists, pharmacists and chiropractors.

“The real question is, ‘How will the authority over patient care be divided?’” asks Alison Barnes, professor of law at Marquette University.

Rick Abrams, CEO of the Wisconsin Medical Society, offers one perspective.

“We absolutely endorse all of the professions practicing at the highest point of their license,” Abrams says. “Everybody has got to work together. There has to be a leader, and we believe that should be the physician.”

The best model of care is when patients have access to both doctors and nurses, according to Sally Peck Lundeen, dean of the UW-Milwaukee College of Nursing. “We help patients quickly understand the value-added of the nurse,” she explains. “We are not interested in replacing physicians.”

Wisconsin is working hard to educate and train more doctors. MCW, which already graduates 200 new physicians a year, is adding satellite campuses in Green Bay and central Wisconsin. The new campuses will admit 15 students each when they begin operation in July 2015. Plans are to increase the classes to at least 25 students within a few years.

Faculty and facilities will be shared with colleges and health systems already in those areas, an innovative approach that makes the $23 million in start-up costs at least $75 million lower than for a typical new medical school. “This is a very efficient model,” Raymond says.

And, it’s less expensive for students. Schooling will take three years rather than the traditional four (summer vacation and other breaks will be shortened); graduates will get into the workforce sooner. Officials hope to secure residency slots nearby so students don’t get their education here only to end up leaving the state for clinical training.

Elsewhere in Wisconsin, the UW School of Medicine and Public Health in recent years introduced programs to boost physician numbers in the state’s under served rural and urban areas. Also, a proposal has been floated to create the state’s first college of osteopathic medicine in Jefferson. It would open in 2015 at the earliest, with 100 students in its initial class.

Abrams and Raymond say the boosts in enrollment at MCW and UW will go a long way toward addressing the state’s physician shortages. Still, Raymond doesn’t rule out yet another MCW program in Eau Claire or La Crosse using the Green Bay/central Wisconsin model.

Plenty of people want to study nursing, but space and faculty limitations prevent hundreds from getting into those programs, too. Seats are being added, but not fast enough to address anticipated shortages. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects nursing as the top occupation in terms of job growth through 2020.

At UWM, about 1,500 students begin the curriculum as freshmen, but after four semesters when they apply to the College of Nursing, only about 200 can be accepted. Marquette University’s program offers direct admission for freshmen and gets some 1,700 applications for 130 coveted spots.

Students training to be nurses might find that job opportunities are in places they didn’t originally expect. Today, fewer than half of nurses employed in Wisconsin work in hospital settings.

“We need to be educating our nursing students to be ready to set foot into health care environments that are more complicated than ever, with patients who are sicker than ever, including in the community,” says Margaret Faut Callahan, dean of the College of Nursing and interim provost at Marquette University.

Community-based care generally is welcomed by the public, according to UWM’s Lundeen. “Our experience is that patients get this,” she explains. “Given the opportunity to be well cared for outside the hospital or admitted to a place where there are issues of infections and other problems, most patients would be much happier outside the hospital environment.”

Surveys also project a nationwide workforce shortage of up to 40,000 physical therapists by 2020. In occupational therapy, while there’s no forecast of a lack of workers, more than 95 percent of graduates have jobs in the field within three months. For students interested in those careers, the numbers game is as brutal as in medicine or nursing; usually there are anywhere from three to 12 applicants for every available seat.

Marquette reports an increase of 250 applicants (to 869) for its physician assistant studies program last year for a mere 51 slots — leaving 16 of 17 students shut out.

“There is an amazing amount of student interest,” says William E. Cullinan, dean of Marquette’s College of Health Sciences, “but there’s really no over-arching solution that I see to the (shortage of) clinical training sites.”

Expanded or new programs in pharmacy, physician assistant studies, exercise physiology and public health at area schools such as Concordia University Wisconsin and Carroll University “will address the provider shortage,” according to MCW’s Raymond.

Wisconsin has approximately 500,000 uninsured people (about 4 percent less of its population than the national average), leaving local experts somewhat less pessimistic about the Affordable Care Act’s impact here.

“If the Affordable Care Act is successful in reducing the uninsured, that will exacerbate the shortage we’re all feeling in primary care medical specialties and other front-line health care providers,” says Abrams, of the Wisconsin Medical Society. “But from where I sit, that is a better problem to have than to have the number of uninsured remain stagnant or worse yet, increase.”

And Raymond is counting on Wisconsin’s long-revered work ethic.

“Health care workers will make sure they do everything they can to provide extra capacity. They’ll do that in the short term,” he says. “People will just work harder.”

Get to Know

Your Health Care Team

A little confused when you walk into your doctor’s office when your doctor isn’t the person you see? A new group of medical professionals is becoming mainstream in our health care system. Here’s some insight on who you might meet at your next appointment.

Physician assistants perform physical examinations, diagnose and treat illnesses, prescribe medications, order and interpret lab tests, perform procedures, assist in surgery, provide patient education and counseling, and make rounds in hospitals and nursing homes. They work with the supervision of a physician. After earning a bachelor’s degree, Pas take about 27 months of additional coursework and clinical training.

Nurse practitioners assess patients, order and interpret diagnostic tests, make diagnoses, and initiate and manage treatment plans — including prescribing medications. Nps must complete a master’s or doctoral degree program, and have advanced clinical training beyond that of a registered nurse.

Doctors of osteopathic medicine practice medicine, perform surgery, prescribe medication and use technology to diagnose disease and evaluate injury. They also use hands-on diagnosis and treatment therapy known as osteopathic manipulative medicine. D. O.’s complete four years of medical school plus an additional 300 to 500 hours in the study of hands-on manual medicine and the body’s musculoskeletal system.

— Cathy Breitenbucher

Sources: American Academy of Physician Assistants, American Association of Nurse Practitioners, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Medical College of Wisconsin

Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Clinic

BACKGROUND: Founded in the 1940s, the Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Clinic at the Medical College of Wisconsin, was one of the first academic asthma, allergy and immunology programs in the country. Our practice consists of 11 board certified allergist-immunologists and 6 advanced practice nurse practitioners providing care for the whole family -- children and adults.

SPECIALTY: Comprehensive Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology care for the entire family.

PHILOSOPHY: To provide exceptional care while improving quality and efficiency. Combining expert, compassionate, multi-disciplinary care with state-of-the-art resources and facilities, our physician-led teams offer accurate diagnostic services and effective treatments.

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS: Our physicians are listed in “Milwaukee Magazine’s Top Doctors”, “America’s Top Physicians,” “Best Doctors in America,” and “US News and World Report Top Doctors”. Our primary immunodeficiency program is nationally recognized and one of only fourteen Modell Centers for Primary Immunodeficiency — and the only one in Wisconsin. In addition to world-class cutting-edge research, our faculty also train future allergy-immunology specialists in our highly respected fellowship program.

AFFILIATIONS: Medical College of Wisconsin, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Milwaukee’s Asthma Camp, Asthma Educator Course, Food Allergy Community Support groups, Immune Deficiency Foundation, and Fight Asthma Milwaukee Allies.

CONTACT INFORMATION: Our main campus is at 9000 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, and we have clinics in New Berlin and Kenosha. To schedule an appointment at any of these 3 sites, call 414-607-5280, toll-free 877-607-5280.

Pictured: John Routes, MD, Jordan Fink, MD, James Lustig, MD, Asriani Chiu, MD, Mitchell Grayson, MD, James Verbsky, MD, Dorothy Cheung, MD, Leslie Gimenez, MD, Kristen Volkman, MD, Heidi Zafra, MD; Jeanne Conner, APNP, Lisa Crandall, APNP, Mary Hintermeyer, APNP, Mary Ho, APNP, Carrie Lee, APNP, Sara Lowe, APNP, Carol Roberson, APNP; Not Pictured: Jeanne Conner, APNP; Joshua Steinberg, MD

Dr. Andrew campbell, M.D.

Campbell Facial Plastics and Quintessa Medical Spa

Years in Practice: 15

SPECIALTY: Facial Plastic Surgery. Dr. Campbell is double board certified in facial plastic & reconstructive surgery as well as head and neck surgery (ENT). He specializes in facial rejuvenation and rhinoplasty. He is also a national and international educator in facial plastic surgery.

In 2005, he founded Quintessa Medical Spa to satisfy his patient’s desires for non-surgical rejuvenation options. He was one of the first in the nation to offer Ultherapy, the only non-surgical device that’s FDA approved for facial lifting. Ultherapy uses micro-focused ultrasound to lift the brows, cheeks, jowls and neck, delivering impressive results with absolutely no downtime.

PHILOSOPHY: Provide exceptional results that look natural while minimizing downtime and risk. Give clients multiple treatment options, educate them on the advantages of each, and allow them to choose the plan that works in their budget, downtime, and expectations. A well educated client makes a happy client.

Dr. Campbell can perform many of his rejuvenation procedures right in the office setting using local anesthesia. This saves the client thousands of dollars, and eases the minds of those that don’t want to go to an operating room.

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS: Dr. Campbell speaks regularly at national and international conferences on topics as varied as laser resurfacing, Ultherapy, injectables, and other non-surgical rejuvenation options. He also speaks on surgical modalities, mainly advanced facelift techniques. He chairs national committees for the American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. He is also a board member and examiner for the American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, examining those that are trying to become board certified in facial plastic surgery.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Dr. Campbell and Quintessa Medical Spa support a variety of local charities with their fundraising events throughout the year. He is also a director for the Midwest Council for Children with Disabilities and hosts their yearly fundraiser, “Top Chef”, in Elkhart Lake, WI which has raised $50,000.00 per year. All monies directly support local children with disabilities.

contact info:
now serving clients in sheboygan, mequon and ournewest location in Brookfield.
Mequon & Brookfield: 262-242-7772
sheboygan: 920-458-7772
www.quintessamedicalspa.com
www.campbellplastics.com

Technology Provides

'Real Life' Experience

With hospitals and clinics unable to train all the students who want to work in health care, technology is taking on an increasing role.

Universities are adding or upgrading simulation centers so students can stay on campus to learn and practice their skills. Such centers look a lot like a hospital ward, with real-world hospital beds, monitors and other equipment. The “patients” are expensive mannequins so realistic they can cough, speak, blink, breathe, sweat, give birth or go into cardiac arrest.

Within the past year, both Marquette University and the Milwaukee School of Engineering opened new simulation space for their nursing students. Using mannequins, students learn how to handle rare emergency situations as well as more common tasks such as putting in breathing tubes.

Some nursing programs have students do up to half of their clinical hours in a simulation center.

“At the national level, there is some debate as to how much clinical work can be done through simulation,” notes Sally Peck Lundeen, dean of the College of Nursing at UW-Milwaukee. “I imagine over the next couple years, we will be at the 30 percent level.”

Health care systems are using sim centers, too. Wheaton Franciscan, which donated $1 million to the facility at Marquette, sends nurses, doctors and others to MU for training — often right alongside students. Kindred Healthcare, which provides postacute care services at two Milwaukee-area facilities, is partnering with MSOE for continuing education of its nurses.

Planning also is under way to create a 20,000-square-foot sim center at Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin for use by the entire Froedtert Health system, including staff of the area’s only Level 1 trauma center.

MCW Celebrates

120th Anniversary

The Medical College of Wisconsin has a lot to celebrate in this, the 120th anniversary of its founding as the Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons. Its faculty physicians and scientists are credited with nearly 200 significant research discoveries that touch many aspects of health, including:

1939: Development of the first self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) devices used by deep-sea divers to prevent “the bends.”

1972: Development of the first rapid, accurate blood screening test to detect lead poisoning.

1996: Identification of genes associated with the presence and severity of color blindness, and invention of a diagnostic test for color blindness.

1999: Development of an MRI method for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease.

2001: Discovery that female athletes experiencing amenorrhea are at high risk for both cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

2005: Development of the Milwaukee Protocol during the world’s first successful treatment of a rabies patient.

2007: Discovery of the “good cholesterol” gene that plays a role in determining levels of HDL cholesterol.

2011: Identification of the gene responsible for “elephant man disease.”

— Cathy Breitenbucher

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Medical+Guide/1458239/167404/article.html.

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