Background Image

Golfweek Comp Issue March 8, 2013 : Page 10

T HE T OY B OX Ask the Expert Butch Harmon Golf instructor Harmon is one of the few high-profile teachers to succeed as a player, having won the 1971 Broome County Open, an unofficial event and forerunner to the B.C. Open. For several years, Harmon has been the primary spokesman for Winn golf grips. What grip advice would you give golfers? Every year they should be buying a whole new set of grips. It should become a habit. Just do it every year at the start of the season. What about storing your clubs in your car trunk? Don’t do it in the summer in Las Vegas or the winter in Green Bay. Hot temperatures can damage grips and so can cold temperatures. The worst thing a golfer can do is play with grips that are slick, or dried out, or don’t have the feel that they’re supposed to have. How much emphasis do you place on selecting the proper grip size? With the tremendous variety of grips available today, there is no excuse for not having the proper size. When I conduct a clubfitting session, I do a whole presentation on grips. It’s that important. What’s the best way to clean grips? Don’t submerge them in a bucket of water. Don’t scrub them. Just take a damp towel and wipe them down. Watch Fred Couples. Before every shot he takes a damp towel and cleans his grip. What kind of grip did you use when you were playing the Tour? The black and green Victory. I would go off and on with the Victory cord. When I used it, I would sand the cord down to the rubber. That way it was smoother. – James Achenbach Getting a handle on the latest grips There are plenty of new advances in grips to captivate golfers’ interest. The landscape includes new colors, new innovations, new materials and a startling variety of grips that should allow any golfer to find the right one. Grip weight has become an important topic because it can affect the overall weight, swingweight and balance point of a golf club. Grip Month Check out our in-depth package on grips during March at golfweek.com/gripmonth Among standard-size grips, weights vary from Winn’s lowest published weight of 22 grams (for the Dri-Tac Wrap Lite) to Boccieri’s stated 92-gram grip. – James Achenbach Golf Pride Niion 1 The skinny: Color is the buzz word for grips in 2013, and the vivid variety of the Niion is a prominent example. Has a 3D hexagonal design in key gripping areas. Weighs 50 grams. Available in dark blue, white, green, yellow and orange. Cost: $7.99 Available: Immediate Winn DuraTech 2 The skinny: This is a revolu-tionary grip for Winn because it fuses separate materials for top and bottom portions of the grip. The upper hand features Winn’s proprietary rubber compound called Elastom ETX, designed to provide durability and non-slip texture. Meanwhile, the bottom hand is made of slightly softer WinnDry XT polymer for a tacky and responsive feel. Weighs 45 grams. Cost: $8.99 Available: Immediate Boccieri Secret Grip 3 1 2 3 4 5 The skinny: This 92-gram grip is almost twice as heavy as a standard grip. The theory is that the grip, with a tungsten weight chip in the butt end, creates a counterbalance. This is similar to the accuracy-enhancing counterbalance strategy followed by Jack Nicklaus in his prime, and Nicklaus is a spokesman for this grip. Developed by Steve and Sandy Boccieri of Heavy Putter fame. Cost: $16.95 Available: Immediate 10 Golfweek • March 8, 2013 • www.golfweek.com

The Toy Box

Ask the Expert <br /> <br /> Butch Harmon <br /> <br /> Golf instructor <br /> <br /> Harmon is one of the few high-profile teachers to succeed as a player, having won the 1971 Broome County Open, an unofficial event and forerunner to the B. C. Open. For several years, Harmon has been the primary spokesman for Winn golf grips.<br /> <br /> What grip advice would you give golfers?<br /> <br /> Every year they should be buying a whole new set of grips. It should become a habit. Just do it every year at the start of the season.<br /> <br /> What about storing your clubs in your car trunk?<br /> <br /> Don’t do it in the summer in Las Vegas or the winter in Green Bay. Hot temperatures can damage grips and so can cold temperatures. The worst thing a golfer can do is play with grips that are slick, or dried out, or don’t have the feel that they’re supposed to have.<br /> <br /> How much emphasis do you place on selecting the proper grip size?<br /> <br /> With the tremendous variety of grips available today, there is no excuse for not having the proper size. When I conduct a clubfitting session, I do a whole presentation on grips. It’s that important.<br /> <br /> What’s the best way to clean grips?<br /> <br /> Don’t submerge them in a bucket of water. Don’t scrub them. Just take a damp towel and wipe them down. Watch Fred Couples. Before every shot he takes a damp towel and cleans his grip.<br /> <br /> What kind of grip did you use when you were playing the Tour?<br /> <br /> The black and green Victory. I would go off and on with the Victory cord. When I used it, I would sand the cord down to the rubber. That way it was smoother.<br /> <br /> – James Achenbach<br /> <br /> Getting a handle on the latest grips<br /> <br /> There are plenty of new advances in grips to captivate golfers’ interest. The landscape includes new colors, new innovations, new materials and a startling variety of grips that should allow any golfer to find the right one.<br /> <br /> Grip weight has become an important topic because it can affect the overall weight, swingweight and balance point of a golf club.<br /> <br /> Golf Pride Niion <br /> <br /> The skinny: Color is the buzz word for grips in 2013, and the vivid variety of the Niion is a prominent example. Has a 3D hexagonal design in key gripping areas. Weighs 50 grams. Available in dark blue, white, green, yellow and orange.<br /> <br /> Cost: $7.99 <br /> <br /> Available: Immediate<br /> <br /> Winn DuraTech <br /> <br /> The skinny: This is a revolutionary grip for Winn because it fuses separate materials for top and bottom portions of the grip. The upper hand features Winn’s proprietary rubber compound called Elastom ETX, designed to provide durability and non-slip texture. Meanwhile, the bottom hand is made of slightly softer WinnDry XT polymer for a tacky and responsive feel. Weighs 45 grams.<br /> <br /> Cost: $8.99 <br /> <br /> Available: Immediate<br /> <br /> Boccieri Secret Grip <br /> <br /> The skinny: This 92-gram grip is almost twice as heavy as a standard grip. The theory is that the grip, with a tungsten weight chip in the butt end, creates a counterbalance. This is similar to the accuracy-enhancing counterbalance strategy followed by Jack Nicklaus in his prime, and Nicklaus is a spokesman for this grip. Developed by Steve and Sandy Boccieri of Heavy Putter fame.<br /> <br /> Cost: $16.95 <br /> <br /> Available: Immediate<br /> <br /> Lamkin iLine <br /> <br /> The skinny: Color, color, color. This 50-gram grip, made of a tacky, low-torque thermoplastic elastomer, is offered in a rainbow of colors. Standard-size colors are black, navy blue, turquoise blue, neon green and neon yellow, while undersize colors are black and magenta. The surface features Lamkin’s popular Crossline pattern.<br /> <br /> Cost: $9.99 <br /> <br /> Available: Immediate<br /> <br /> Pure Pro Grip <br /> <br /> The skinny: Want the traction of cord without the cord? Pure’s Pro Grip, designed for skilled players who prefer a rougher feel and seek maximum feedback, has a grooved surface for a secure grip. Weighs 54.5 grams.<br /> <br /> Cost: $6.49 <br /> <br /> Available: Immediate<br /> <br /> Grip Month <br /> <br /> Check out our in-depth package on grips during March at golfweek.com/gripmonth<br /> <br /> Among standard-size grips, weights vary from Winn’s lowest published weight of 22 grams (for the Dri-Tac Wrap Lite) to Boccieri’s stated 92-gram grip.<br /> <br /> – James Achenbach<br /> <br /> In Play<br /> <br /> Thompson tames challenges with Ping <br /> <br /> Battling something as powerful and devastating as Hurricane Katrina, Michael Thompson must have learned a few lessons, such as how to keep his cool under duress. Virtually all of Thompson’s accomplishments have come on tough courses: runner-up in the 2007 U.S. Amateur, low amateur in the 2008 U.S. Open, runner-up in the 2012 U.S. Open, winner of the 2013 Honda.<br /> <br /> Thompson has used Ping clubs throughout his college and pro careers, and his bag at the Honda Classic contained 13 Ping clubs and one from Japanese manufacturer Akira.<br /> <br /> Experimenting with iron shafts more than most players, Thompson has gone back to True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 steel shafts for 2013.<br /> <br /> Thompson’s bag: Ping i20 driver (9.5 degree, with Grafalloy ProLaunch Red X shaft), Ping G25 3-wood (15 degree, with ProLaunch Red X shaft), Akira Prototype M218 5-wood (18 degree, with ProLaunch Red X shaft), Ping S56 irons (3-9, with True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 shafts), Ping Tour-S pitching wedge (47 degree, with Dynamic Gold X100 shaft), Ping Anser gap and sand wedges (52 and 58 degree, with Dynamic Gold X100 shafts) and Ping Anser 4 Classic putter. Thompson played a 2013 Titleist Pro V1x ball.<br /> <br /> Pro V1x success spans generations <br /> <br /> Whether it’s the latest vintage or an earlier model, Titleist Pro V1x continued its winning ways this past weekend.<br /> <br /> The top-three finishers at the Honda Classic used the 2013 Pro V1x, and Stacy Lewis played the 2009 version in claiming the HSBC Women’s Champions on the LPGA. Other Pro V1x winners: Patrick Cantlay used the 2011 Pro V1x in taking the Colombia Championship on the Web.com Tour, while Michael Hendry won the Australasian Tour’s Victorian Open with the 2013 edition, which is the sixth iteration of the ball. (Titleist makes previous versions of the Pro V1 and Pro V1x available to touring pros.)<br /> <br /> Counterbalancing: An alternative for anchoring?<br /> <br /> As pros look ahead to a possible ban of the anchoring stroke, some are taking a renewed interest in counterbalanced putters. With counterbalancing, extra weight is placed in the butt end of the club, often by using a heavier grip. This is intended to provide additional stability during the stroke.<br /> <br /> The latest to experiment with counterbalancing include David Duval and Steve Marino. At the Honda Classic, Duval used a 36-inch Nike Method 006 putter with a 75-gram Iomic grip. Marino’s 38-inch TaylorMade Daddy Long Legs had a 130-gram TaylorMade grip made by Winn.<br /> <br /> TaylorMade staffers work with new gear <br /> <br /> Justin Rose is easing his way into TaylorMade RocketBladez Tour irons. At the WGC-Accenture Match Play, he switched his 3- and 4-irons from TaylorMade Tour Preferred MB to RocketBladez Tour. At the Honda Classic, he did the same with the 5-iron.<br /> <br /> Meanwhile, the up-and-down week of Camilo Villegas (first-round lead to missed cut) included the addition of two TaylorMade RocketBallz Stage 2 fairway woods. One was 17 degree, the other 19 degree. Both had Matrix Ozik shafts. Villegas also switched to the new TaylorMade Lethal ball.<br /> <br /> – James Achenbach<br /> <br /> Dusek joins Golfweek’s equipment team<br /> <br /> Golfweek has taken its equipment coverage to a new level with the hiring of Senior Writer David Dusek.<br /> <br /> Dusek, 42, one of the game’s most authoritative and respected voices on equipment, joined Golfweek March 1 after spending the past 11 years at Golf.com. He will combine with James Achenbach, associate editor of equipment and technology, to create the most formidable team of equipment experts in the business.<br /> <br /> “We are very excited to add David’s voice, expertise and experience to our expanding coverage of a category that is extremely important to our readers,” Golfweek Editor Jeff Babineau said.<br /> <br /> In addition to contributing to Golfweek’s weekly Toy Box section, Dusek will help to expand the digital offerings on equipment at Golfweek.com. The addition of Dusek to the Golfweek staff will result in more stories, blogs, photo galleries and videos addressing equipment in print and online.<br /> <br /> “I’m thrilled to have a chance to work with the staff of Golfweek to make the magazine and Golfweek.com the premier home for equipment news and information,” Dusek said. “Whether it’s players on the PGA Tour switching into new gear or manufacturers continuing to innovate and design better clubs for amateur players, there never has been a more exciting time to cover golf equipment.”

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here