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MY October 2012 : Page 58

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 SIMPLY NUTRITIOUS AND DELICIOUS by Dawn Bause My husband and I just returned from our fall “foodie tour” in Italy. This is a country where people live to eat WELL, not just eat anything to live, as so many people do in this country. For an Italian, eating well is more important than many other things in life and, it’s a way of thinking that I have finally adopted. Eating well promotes wellbeing, health, and longevity. It gives my life meaning and a purpose. My day, my work, and my life are so much more “delicious” because of it. I enjoy preparing, sharing and eating good food; food that looks good, smells good, tastes good, and is good for you. Food that is Simply Nutritious and Delicious. I read a great article recently how our bodies are like engines. The higher the octane the fuel, the better they run. A Mediterranean-style diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, olive oil and a daily glass of red wine is the highest octane fuel you can get. Study after study has shown the benefits of this type diet, including reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and many types of cancers. But here is where the confusion comes in. There is not just one Mediterranean diet, there are hundreds of little towns all along the Mediterranean and they all have different staple ingredients. But, the one thing they all seem to use and consume in every Mediterranean town is a whole lot of olive oil. This is something I do too. I probably consume between one quarter cup to one-third cup of extra virgin oil per day. I always put extra virgin olive oil in a pour bottle with a spout so that I can drizzle it into my cooking pans, and on my food. It saves time, eliminates spills and makes everything taste better. I religiously use it on every veggie I cook including potatoes. I drizzle it on all my salad greens, in soups, sauces, pasta, on chicken, fish and meat, even if I have used it in the cooking process, I’ll drizzle more before serving. It adds flavor, and richness like butter, but it so much healthier. Sprinkle a few course granules of sea salt or kosher salt on top of the oil and the flavor explodes. When buying olive oil, always make sure there is a harvest date or expiration date on the bottle because it has a shelf life of 18 months maximum. Be sure to store it in a dark place; cupboard or pantry and don’t refrigerate it as that will not prolong the life of it. So once you buy it, use it! Although I am not a vegetarian, I eat lots and lots of veggies. With every meal, including breakfast I consume 2-3 different vegetables. Tomatoes, arugula, spinach, zucchini, onions, broccoli, asparagus, squash, eggplant, sweet bell peppers, carrots and celery are some of my favorites. This month is the time I use locally grown spaghetti squash. It’s a great alternative and substitute for pasta made with white refined flour. I bake it whole, after piercing it with a knife a couple times, at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Let it cool, cut it in half, clean out the seeds with a spoon, and then continue to scoop out the squash which really looks like yellow spaghetti. Use it as a side dish or top it with your favorite pasta sauce for a main course. One of the easiest ways to eat it, is to drizzled it with some extra virgin olive oil, a sprinkle of sea salt, a little freshly grated parmesan cheese, some fresh cracked pepper, a couple dried red pepper flakes, and a few pieces of freshly minced flat leaf parsley, or fresh basil for color and added flavor. And guess what ? You can freeze cooked spaghetti squash. I divide it up into smaller portions and freeze it in freezer-safe baggies. Thanks for tuning in again this month. Here’s a toast to enjoying whole foods made from scratch. Buon Appetito! Contact Dawn about private cooking parties, team building events, and foodie trips to Italy Email: AskDawnNow@aol.com Dawn Bause is a cooking instructor, cookbook author and owner of Cooking with Dawn Tours, LLC from Commerce Township, www.cookingwithdawn.com 58 | MY Magazine www.mymetroyou.com

Healthy Cooking 101

Dawn Bause


My husband and I just returned from our fall “foodie tour” in Italy. This is a country where people live to eat WELL, not just eat anything to live, as so many people do in this country. For an Italian, eating well is more important than many other things in life and, it’s a way of thinking that I have finally adopted.

Eating well promotes wellbeing, health, and longevity. It gives my life meaning and a purpose. My day, my work, and my life are so much more “delicious” because of it. I enjoy preparing, sharing and eating good food; food that looks good, smells good, tastes good, and is good for you. Food that is Simply Nutritious and Delicious.

I read a great article recently how our bodies are like engines. The higher the octane the fuel, the better they run. A Mediterranean-style diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, olive oil and a daily glass of red wine is the highest octane fuel you can get. Study after study has shown the benefits of this type diet, including reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and many types of cancers. But here is where the confusion comes in. There is not just one Mediterranean diet, there are hundreds of little towns all along the Mediterranean and they all have different staple ingredients. But, the one thing they all seem to use and consume in every Mediterranean town is a whole lot of olive oil. This is something I do too. I probably consume between one quarter cup to one-third cup of extra virgin oil per day.

I always put extra virgin olive oil in a pour bottle with a spout so that I can drizzle it into my cooking pans, and on my food. It saves time, eliminates spills and makes everything taste better. I religiously use it on every veggie I cook including potatoes. I drizzle it on all my salad greens, in soups, sauces, pasta, on chicken, fish and meat, even if I have used it in the cooking process, I’ll drizzle more before serving. It adds flavor, and richness like butter, but it so much healthier. Sprinkle a few course granules of sea salt or kosher salt on top of the oil and the flavor explodes.

When buying olive oil, always make sure there is a harvest date or expiration date on the bottle because it has a shelf life of 18 months maximum. Be sure to store it in a dark place; cupboard or pantry and don’t refrigerate it as that will not prolong the life of it. So once you buy it, use it!

Although I am not a vegetarian, I eat lots and lots of veggies. With every meal, including breakfast I consume 2-3 different vegetables. Tomatoes, arugula, spinach, zucchini, onions, broccoli, asparagus, squash, eggplant, sweet bell peppers, carrots and celery are some of my favorites. This month is the time I use locally grown spaghetti squash. It’s a great alternative and substitute for pasta made with white refined flour. I bake it whole, after piercing it with a knife a couple times, at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Let it cool, cut it in half, clean out the seeds with a spoon, and then continue to scoop out the squash which really looks like yellow spaghetti. Use it as a side dish or top it with your favorite pasta sauce for a main course. One of the easiest ways to eat it, is to drizzled it with some extra virgin olive oil, a sprinkle of sea salt, a little freshly grated parmesan cheese, some fresh cracked pepper, a couple dried red pepper flakes, and a few pieces of freshly minced flat leaf parsley, or fresh basil for color and added flavor. And guess what? You can freeze cooked spaghetti squash. I divide it up into smaller portions and freeze it in freezer-safe baggies.

Thanks for tuning in again this month. Here’s a toast to enjoying whole foods made from scratch.

Buon Appetito!

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/Healthy+Cooking+101/1186143/127580/article.html.

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