Tucson Lifestyle Home and Garden September 2012 : Page 18

Homes of the Year Tucson Lifestyle Home & Garden , in partnership with the Southern Arizona Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), presents the 2012 Homes of AIA 2012 James Trahan, AIA, is a licensed architect who also holds residential and commercial general con-tracting licenses. He is a past recipient of the AIA’s Young Architect Award, as well as past president of both the AIA Rio Salado Chapter and AIA Arizona. Trahan established 180 degrees, inc., a Phoenix design-build firm, in 2001. Patricia Brown Warren, AIA, established the firm of Warren Architecture LLC in Connecticut in 2001, and relocated to Tucson in 2008. Her practice focuses on residential design, from new construction to addi-tions and renovations. Warren has been active for the past several years in the organization of Tucson’s Architecture Week. Ed Marley, AIA, is a partner with the Tucson archi-tecture firm Swaim Associates, and a graduate of the University of Arizona. He is a past president of both the Southern Arizona Chapter of the AIA and AIA Arizona. In 2004 he was awarded the Arizona Architects Medal. His own house will soon become part of a multi-resi-dence family compound. 18 T ucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / SEPTEMBER 2012 Meet the Judges the Year. www .tucsonlifestyle.com

AIA Homes Of The Year 2012

Tucson Lifestyle Home & Garden, in partnership with the Southern Arizona Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), presents the 2012 Homes of the Year.

Meet the Judges

James Trahan, AIA, is a licensed architect who also holds residential and commercial general contracting licenses. He is a past recipient of the AIA’s Young Architect Award, as well as past president of both the AIA Rio Salado Chapter and AIA Arizona. Trahan established 180 degrees, inc., a Phoenix design-build firm, in 2001.

Patricia Brown Warren, AIA, established the firm of Warren Architecture LLC in Connecticut in 2001, and relocated to Tucson in 2008. Her practice focuses on residential design, from new construction to additions and renovations. Warren has been active for the past several years in the organization of Tucson’s Architecture Week.

Ed Marley, AIA, is a partner with the Tucson architecture firm Swaim Associates, and a graduate of the University of Arizona. He is a past president of both the Southern Arizona Chapter of the AIA and AIA Arizona. In 2004 he was awarded the Arizona Architects Medal. His own house will soon become part of a multi-residence family compound.

New Construction

HK Associates Inc.

Photography by Bill Timmerman

The concept for this residence is a modern interpretation of the Barrio Historico neighborhood’s traditional courtyard architecture. From the street, the home appears consistent in style with adjacent units, especially with door and window openings that adhere to neighborhood guidelines. The interior differs greatly, with a courtyard that focuses on the sky and a swimming pool that fosters a year-round connection between the home’s interior and exterior spaces. A long rooftop periscope over the kitchen draws the view of the distant mountain vista into the interior, as if through a broad window.

New Construction

Ibarra Rosano Design Architects

Photography by Bill Timmerman

This innovative home appears to hover above the desert, responding to both the challenges of the site and to an ethic of building with minimal disruption to the natural environment. The house was oriented perpendicular to the topography to harness the sun, frame views and capture breezes. This was made possible by the use of structural post-tensioned concrete slabs that hold the house level against the preserved ground plane. The house’s three tubular “volumes” are linked by two bridges. The main and guest wing volumes cross-ventilate north and south, while the auto court “tube” orients to the sky.

Renovation

HA/RU: Hazelbaker Rush

Photography by Dale L. Rush

This ongoing renovation of a 1927 bungalow in central Tucson is possible because the wood and brick structure was well built, but its “circulatory and nervous system,” i.e., plumbing and electric, required an entire overhaul. The project focused on keeping the charm of the home while modernizing the infrastructure for maximum ecological value. A tankless water heater with supplemental solar; grid-tied solar electric panel; gray water collection cistern and irrigation system; dual-pane glazing; and R-30 denim insulation will all be added without changing the outward appearance, with the exception of a porch overhang on the south-facing side of the home.

Honorable Mentionthe pros who know

DUST

Photography by Cade Hayes

This rammed earth mountain retreat was sited in response to the adjacent arroyos, outcroppings, saguaros, air movement and views, thus maximizing the benefits and beauty of the area while preserving the land as much as possible. Solar heat gain was reduced by orienting the house along an east-west axis, and minimizing the door and window openings on the east and west façades. The main living spaces open under deep overhangs to allow unadulterated views. A large capacity water collection and filtration system will be incorporated, as well as a photo-voltaic solar power system.

Honorable Mention

Bil Taylor Associates, Inc.

Photography by Liam Frederick and Peter Neff

Set adjacent to a rugged slope, the floor plan of this project expands up and outward, with an interplay of structural steel, masonry and glass filtering. Bamboo ceilings, clay plaster walls, cork and colored concrete floors comprise the interior material palette. Some utilitarian spaces are cleverly disguised, such as a stair handrail that becomes a door pull, opening a wall-disguised jib door to the laundry. A full-height glass dining room wall withdraws into a cavity, letting life spill unimpeded onto the porch beyond.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/AIA+Homes+Of+The+Year+2012/1159288/124137/article.html.

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