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Romanza Event Program 2012 : Page 2

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&#0f; BY RAPHAEL COSME SPRING FAIR Great local music, food from local vendors, arts, crafts & more! FREE PARKING • PICNICS PLAYGROUND Saturday, May 19 • 10am–6pm OLD-FASHIONED FAMILY FUN! The cities of Cádiz, Spain and St. Augustine, Florida, will join together to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Spanish Constitution of 1812. In 1783, the British released the Florida colonies back to Spain in St. Augustine. The French revolution caused a wave of liberalism to spread over Europe. French armies, under Napoleon, overran much of Spain and Joseph, brother of Napoleon, was set to be King over the partially conquered realm. During this period the delegates to the National Assembly (Cortes) met at Cádiz in 1809-1813 and adopted the so-called “liberal” Constitution of 1812. At the same time, St. Augustine’s city council proposed that a stone and coquina obelisk be constructed in the plaza as a symbol of the new constitution. Mayor Geronimo Álvarez and Mr. Eusebio Maria Gomez introduced to the council the estimated cost for construction of the obelisk in the amount of 168 pesos. It took many weeks to raise the money to invest in the project. On June 21, 1813, the council approved construction of an obelisk 30 feet high containing a tablet carved with the liberalist constitution inlaid on the east side. A budget was also approved for the construction materials, daily wages for laborers and wages for the master builder totaling 168 reales daily. In the end, the project took more reales than were originally planned. Later in 1813, the obelisk was erected and the plaza was named La Plaza de la Constitución. The names of all personnel involved in the construction of the Constitution Monument are: Don Fernando Directions: South on MLK Ave., turn right on Cerro St., left on Riberia St., follow to the end at Eddie Vickers Park. ±$0/5*/6&5)&'6/± LINCOLNVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET Sunday • Same Location • 11am—4pm ST. AUGUSTINE’S LOCAL RESTAURANTS 2 / ROMANZA WEEK MAY 14–20, 2012 continued —

History

Raphael Cosme

The Last Monument

The cities of Cádiz, Spain and St. Augustine, Florida, will join together to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Spanish Constitution of 1812.

In 1783, the British released the Florida colonies back to Spain in St. Augustine. The French revolution caused a wave of liberalism to spread over Europe. French armies, under Napoleon, overran much of Spain and Joseph, brother of Napoleon, was set to be King over the partially conquered realm. During this period the delegates to the National Assembly (Cortes) met at Cádiz in 1809-1813 and adopted the so-called “liberal” Constitution of 1812.

At the same time, St. Augustine’s city council proposed that a stone and coquina obelisk be constructed in the plaza as a symbol of the new constitution. Mayor Geronimo Álvarez and Mr. Eusebio Maria Gomez introduced to the council the estimated cost for construction of the obelisk in the amount of 168 pesos. It took many weeks to raise the money to invest in the project.

On June 21, 1813, the council approved construction of an obelisk 30 feet high containing a tablet carved with the liberalist constitution inlaid on the east side. A budget was also approved for the construction materials, daily wages for laborers and wages for the master builder totaling 168 reales daily. In the end, the project took more reales than were originally planned.

Later in 1813, the obelisk was erected and the plaza was named La Plaza de la Constitución. The names of all personnel involved in the construction of the Constitution Monument are: Don Fernando De la Maza Arredondo-Council, Don Francisco Robira-Council, Geronimo Álvarez, Ciscopoly, José Bermudez Reyes, José Maria Duarte, Juan de Estralgo, Eusebio Maria Gomez, Martin Hernandez, Antonio Lopez, Ignacio de la Pazuela, Francisco Rosado, Rossell, José Sanchez and Benjamin Seguyer.

With the final defeat of Napoleon in 1814, Ferdinand VII was restored to the Spanish throne. He quickly restored the absolute monarchy, revoked the liberal Constitution of 1812, and ordered the destruction of any monuments dedicated to liberalism. But in St. Augustine, the council only removed the tablet from the plaza’s obelisk and hid it. When the Constitution was restored in 1820, the tablet was placed back on the monument. According to council records, the tablet was replaced with all the ceremonies and majesty that the act deserved.

To read more of the St. Augustine 1812 Constitution Monument, visit www.staugustine-450.com.

Additional information is available at the St. Augustine Historical Society website at www.oldesthouse.org.

Mr. Cosme is a historian who specializes in Latin American history.

Read the full article at http://www.mydigitalpublication.com/article/History/1044603/108914/article.html.

Lincolnville Farmer's Market

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