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Haverford Winter 2012 : Page 14

ford games Haverford’s lacrosse team gathers for a group shot with the Iroquois players after their October 1 game. Lacrosse Cultural Connection Haverford players focus on the Native American roots of the game during a campus visit by a team from the Iroquois Lacrosse Program. By Mara Miller ’10 of Millson’s plans traveled the Haverford grapevine, the Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship eagerly stepped for-ward to help out. As it happened, Dean of Multicultural Affairs Theresa Tensuan ’89 had been brainstorming with the Office of Admis-sion about ways to engage students from Native American communities with the College. When Tensuan learned about the proposed weekend events and spoke with head lacrosse coach Colin Bathory ’99 about the opportunity to join forces, she learned that his own connection to the sport had been strengthened by a childhood friend who taught him about its Iroquois lineage. Bathory “was very enthusiastic about the prospect of a visit,” she says, and he hoped, as she did, to use it as a chance T he modern sport of lacrosse is rooted deep in Native Ameri-can history. Tribes around the continent played early versions of the game, which they called stick-ball, little brother of war or men hit a rounded object in their respective languages. A lot has changed since then, includ-ing the name, introduced by early French settlers, that eventually stuck. And on Swan Field at Haverford, you can catch student athletes playing the present-day version of this ancient game. To highlight their sport’s heritage, members of the men’s varsity lacrosse team helped organize a weekend of aca-demic, cultural and athletic events last fall. “A Weekend of Native American Culture and Sport,” which took place Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, welcomed visitors from the Iroquois Lacrosse Program, an organization that celebrates the sport’s cultural origins through a youth league for high schoolers who live on the Six Nations’ reservations in western New York and Ontario. This one-of-a-kind collaboration among athletes, the College and the com-munity, was spearheaded by midfielder Henry Millson ’13, who organized a similar event as a student at the Taft School, in Watertown, Conn. As word 14 HaverfordMagazine

Ford Games

Lacrosse Cultural Connection<br /> <br /> Haverford players focus on the Native American roots of the game during a campus visit by a team from the Iroquois Lacrosse Program. By Mara Miller ’10<br /> <br /> The modern sport of lacrosse is rooted deep in Native American history. Tribes around the continent played early versions of the game, which they called stick-ball, little brother of war or men hit a rounded object in their respective languages.<br /> <br /> A lot has changed since then, including the name, introduced by early French settlers, that eventually stuck. And on Swan Field at Haverford, you can catch student athletes playing the present-day version of this ancient game.<br /> <br /> To highlight their sport’s heritage, members of the men’s varsity lacrosse team helped organize a weekend of academic, cultural and athletic events last fall. “A Weekend of Native American Culture and Sport,” which took place Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, welcomed visitors from the Iroquois Lacrosse Program, an organization that celebrates the sport’s cultural origins through a youth league for high schoolers who live on the Six Nations’ reservations in western New York and Ontario.<br /> <br /> This one-of-a-kind collaboration among athletes, the College and the community, was spearheaded by midfielder Henry Millson ’13, who organized a similar event as a student at the Taft School, in Watertown, Conn. As word of Millson’s plans traveled the Haverford grapevine, the Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship eagerly stepped forward to help out.<br /> <br /> As it happened, Dean of Multicultural Affairs Theresa Tensuan ’89 had been brainstorming with the Office of Admission about ways to engage students from Native American communities with the College. When Tensuan learned about the proposed weekend events and spoke with head lacrosse coachColin Bathory ’99 about the opportunity to join forces, she learned that his own connection to the sport had been strengthened by a childhood friend who taught him about its Iroquois lineage.<br /> <br /> Bathory “was very enthusiastic about the prospect of a visit,” she says, and he hoped, as she did, to use it as a chance To educate the Haverford community— not only about the sport’s heritage, but about the ways Iroquois culture has helped shape U.S. government, justice systems and social movements.<br /> <br /> Millson says that one of his goals in hosting the Iroquois team was to “remind the community of a part of our history that I think, as a society, we have forgotten.” <br /> <br /> That priority resonated with Parker Snowe ’79, executive director of the CPGC: “Even when we talk about diversity issues, Native Americans are so often left out. We saw the sporting event as an incredible platform for developing crosscultural awareness.” <br /> <br /> So late at night on Friday, Sept. 30, the Iroquois team arrived after a long trip south. The next day, after a welcoming ceremony, breakfast and remarks from hosts and visitors, the teams suited up and faced off on the field. The Fords, who managed a 7-5 win, exchanged jerseys and gifts with their guests and enjoyed getting to know them.<br /> <br /> “We found common ground in lacrosse,” says Millson, “but from there we ended up talking about music, school and life in general.” <br /> <br /> It was Tensuan’s idea to preface the game with a screening of the film Circles: A Native Approach to Restorative Justice by Shanti Thakur, a former artist-in-residence at Haverford.The film documents techniques used by indigenous tribes to heal and reintegrate members who have done something harmful to the community.<br /> <br /> “The entire men’s lacrosse team came to the screening,” says Tensuan. “Restorative justice practitioners speak of ‘walking alongside one another,’ … and this work with the lacrosse team gives me a strong sense of the ways in which sports teams can draw upon their collective gifts, extraordinary discipline and seemingly boundless energy to foster productive and transformative change in the community.” <br /> <br /> Millson says he also hoped the weekend would showcase lacrosse as something more than a game. In Iroquois mythology, the tradition goes back to the beginning of time, when even gods wielded sticks.<br /> <br /> Vince Schiffert, a coach who accompanied the Iroquois squad on their trip, says he and his players are proud to share their culture with the broader lacrosse community.<br /> <br /> “It’s important for players to understand the sport’s background,” he says. “The game was given to us by the Creator, and so it has a sacred nature that’s rare in sports. We call it a medicine game, and it’s something we use to heal and help people. I can’t think of any other sport with that kind of a personal connection.” <br /> <br /> Millson says he gained a sense of pride, and even responsibility, from the visit. “It makes you think about what you are doing to pass on this legacy and story, and it makes you think about how you are carrying yourself as an ambassador of lacrosse,” he says.<br /> <br /> “It is humbling to talk to [people] who have played lacrosse their whole lives about the game not as a sport but a way of life. To talk with them about the game we are all so passionate about really brought the experience full circle.”<br /> <br /> athletics news<br /> <br /> On Nov. 19, the Department of Athletics inducted four new members into its Thomas Glasser ¡¦82 Hall of Achievement. The banquet and ceremony welcomed Joseph Henry Scatter good, Class of 1896, Roger Jones ¡¦52, Hunter R. Rawlings III ¡¦66 and Tracy Kyger Armesto ¡¦93 into the department¡¦s hall of achievement, which honors alumni for their outstanding achievements in one or more varsity sports.<br /> <br /> Sophomore Jen DiCandilo, the starting third baseman for the Haverford SOFTBALL team, was presented with the 2011 Archibald MacIntosh Award during an on-campus ceremony in October. DiCandilo is the first softball player to receive this honor in the award’s 48-year history. The Beta Rho Sigma alumni society has presented the award in MacIntosh’s honor to the top scholarathlete in the first-year class at HaveRFord since 1964. A 2011 second-team all-Centennial Conference selection, DiCandilo, who plans to major in economics, ranked fifth in the league in runs batted in and sixth in doubles.<br /> <br /> More Honors <br /> <br /> A number of Haverford players were recognized recently for their athletic and academic achievements. Senior Andrew Sturner ’12 was voted the 2011 Philadelphia Inquirer/Philly-SIDA Academic All-Area MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY team’s Performer of the Year. Sturner, a 2011 NCAA All-America runner, was joined on the academic all-area team by senior teammate Eric Arnold. Three other Fords garnered fall season academic allarea honors. Emily Lipman ’12 was selected for theWOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY team, Alejandro Rettig y Martinez ’12 was voted to the MEN’S SOCCER team, and Mary Hobbs ’13 was named to the FIELD HOCKEY team. In addition, both Jordan Schilit ’13 and Brian Sokas ’14 earned all-American honors in MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY, and Roxanne Jaffe ’12 was voted a third-team all-American in FIELD HOCKEY.<br /> <br /> Haverford also landed 65 fall studentathletes on the Centennial Conference academic honor roll, more than any other school in the Conference.<br /> <br /> Among them were 22 MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY runners and 11 winners for both WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY and MEN’S SOCCER. WOMEN’S SOCCER was not far behind with 10 named to the list, while FIELD HOCKEY (eight) and VOLLEYBALL (three) rounded out the Haverford fall scholars.<br /> <br /> Postseason results<br /> <br /> For the first time in department history, all six fall sports teams competed in the Centennial Conference postseason.<br /> <br /> MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY raced to the League title before closing out the season with a runner-up finish at the NCAA championship, while WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY finished second at the conference meet and 28th at nationals. FIELD HOCKEY, VOLLEY BALL and WOMEN’S SOCCER all played their way into the Centennial tournament semifinals.<br /> <br /> MEN’S SOCCER, playing in its first Centennial postseason, advanced to the Centennial championship game after Upsetting top-seed Johns Hopkins University on its home turf in the semifinal round, the Fords’ first win over Johns Hopkins since 1995. Haverford and Dickinson College battled to a 1-1 double- overtime draw in the championship final, but the Red Devils advanced to the NCAA tournament after winning the penalty kick shootout, 3-2.<br /> <br /> Visit the Championships Central page at haverford athletics.com to see full postseason results.<br /> <br /> Haverford College was one of 157 institutions to see both its men’s and its women’s SOCCER teams earn the 2011 National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA) Team Academic Award.

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